WWE Supercard Review

WWE Supercard Review

Sep 3, 2014

WWE Supercard is a curious mix of collectable card game and wrestling. Players familiar with other card battlers maybe be forgiven for dismissing WWE Supercard for another microtransactions filled game with little depth, but they’d be danm wrong.

WWE Supercard has players assembling a deck of wrestlers. There are four superstars, one diva and two extra cards to a deck. These extra cards can be objects like a chair or 2×4 that boosts stats, or even a manager to boost the whole team.

Screenshot_2014-08-27-00-39-04Superstars and Divas come in various tiers from common to legendary, but strangely the same superstars have different versions of themselves. So the player might find a common Batista with rather low stats then a rare Batista with far better stats.

Actual matches boil down to best 2 of 3 confrontations where each match compares different wrestler stats and the higher one wins. For example a Singles or Diva match might be decided by toughness, so the player would pick their toughest wrestler or indeed their weakest if they had little chance of winning and may want to keep hold of their better cards. Another match might be won by the more charismatic wrestler.

Tag matches are similar, but both wrestlers’ stats are compared and an additional compatibility factor gauges how well the wrestlers gel.
Wrestlers that like each other work well as a team. This is shown by a wedge shaped diagram on the cards. Wrestlers whose wedges fit together are compatible and gain a boost. Being the same tier grants another boost. Wedges that are the same shape incur no penalty, while wedges that differ signify incompatible wrestlers and the team suffers a 10% penalty.

Screenshot_2014-08-26-19-23-58Matches are fun to watch and building a balanced team and ensuring they work well together is fun and engaging. The sheer number of wrestlers on offer is a plus as well. Heroes from past and present are up for grabs, such as the late great Ultimate Warrior and legendary Stone Cold Steve Austin, to current stars like Batista and John Cena.

Winning a match allows two picks from a face down grid of cards. Rare cards can be found as well and even a loss allows one pick. The game is very fair indeed with new cards and the player gets a constant supply of new stuff to see. Like most card battlers, cards can be used on other cards to boost their stats and constantly reshuffling your deck for maximum strength as newer, stronger cards are found is fun.

WWE Supercard has a goofy, but very enjoyable presentation. Matches are pretty funny as cards waddle down the ramp and in the ring they perform actual wrestling moves, like suplexes and piledrivers on each other as one card explodes. The music is nice and intense and the sound is well done.

Some of the game’s stats are bit off though. Because there are different tiers of cards you might end up with an RVD that is slower than a Diva or even someone like Kane or a Wyatt brother with great charisma, even though they are mostly silent heels.

WWE Superstar is a surprise and an enjoyable game. Its odd mix of spandex and cardboard works very well the game is addictive and there are no nasty microtransactions. That’s the bottom line!


WWE Supercard Review Rundown

8
Graphics/Sound - With sharp, high def cards and amusing animation WWE looks and sounds very good for a card game.
7.5
Controls - A fine interface.
7.5
Gameplay - WWE Supercard's sheer number of wrestlers and amusing matches make it a hoot and there is a surprising amount of depth. Gets repetitive though.
7
Replay Value - Boosting cards and strengthening their deck is likely to reel many players in for a long time. Needs more game modes though.
7.5
Overall - A fun game with depth, WWE Supercard is worth playing for even casual WWE fans.

Download: App available at the Google Play Store »

Allan Curtis
Allan is a writer of many years experience. Passionate about Android, gaming and coffee he weds technical knowhow and writing skill into a maelstrom of awesome. Follow me at #AllanCurtisARF
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