Freaky Friday – Weight On The Moon

Freaky Friday – Weight On The Moon

Aug 12, 2011

This week’s Freaky Friday app hovers around the fringes of actually being pretty interesting. It skirts the border of “huh?” and “ooh!”, never quite managing to build an effective base in either of those two areas. On the one hand, it’s incredibly pointless. It’s also about space, and space is cool.

The app in question is Weight On The Moon, and it does precisely what it says on the digital tin. It tells you what your weight would be on the moon. Not just that, it also tells you what your weight would be on the seven other planets in the solar system, as well as Pluto, which isn’t a planet any more, and the sun. Which is the sun.

You type your “earth weight” into the app and it produces a number in a flash to let you know what you’d weigh on the heavenly body of your choosing. The problem is, it doesn’t tell you what unit of measurement it’s using. Pounds and stone, kilos and grammes, knives and forks? The app’s also a bit of an uggo, although by the standards usually set by entrants to the Freaky Friday hall of shame, it’s the Mona Lisa.

With a bit of spit and polish, Weight On The Moon would be a pretty nice app. Certainly not one you’d be ashamed to whip out and wave in front of your friends at those high class dinner parties you almost certainly never get invited to.

The problem is, you’d only whip it out once. “Hey guys, look at this, I can tell you how much you weight on the moon!” Your audience will no doubt be suitably rapt, and have a good giggle for all of a minute. If you ever, ever try it again though, you’ll just become the moon weight guy, shunned in polite society and made to go and sit on your own in the corner and talk about your boring space mularkey.

Don’t be the moon guy. Don’t ever be the moon guy.

Weight On The Moon is available now, for free, from the Android Market

Harry Slater
Harry is a freelance writer from Hull in the UK. When he's not writing, he spends his time shouting at popular culture and laughing at his manic cat.
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  • Guest

    It doesn’t matter what unit you’re using.  If 10 pounds here weigh 6 on Mars, then 10 kilos here weigh 6 kilos there, 10 tons here weigh 6 tons there, you get the idea.