A mobile look back: Clash Royale Review

A mobile look back: Clash Royale Review

Aug 21, 2017

In an increasingly saturated mobile app market, it is definitely hard to make a name for oneself; having a well-received big brother on the Play Store is definitely a benefit.

Clash Royale, from Supercell — yes, that Supercell — definitely has just that.

The graphics are fun to behold… deliberate, somewhat whimsical characterizations on a colorful background template. The main action is imbibed via a top-down view. The game incorporates animations that help the action along, and they do add visual pop that helps keep one engaged. From fireballs to marching duos, it comes together quite well, and even the side screens feel genially done. there’s detail in the little things — arrows look like arrows, for instance — and even the occasional dragon is easy spot and enjoy.clash3

The sounds are quite appropriate, and all connect with the eye candy component.

If the game feels somewhat familiar — as in, say, Clash of Clans — the similarities are well-intentioned, as both games share creative DNA. This one stands firmly on its own, and the seven-part hands on tutorial helps one understand the flow of the action.

The main idea is to win PVP battles; at the base level, there are three enemy towers, and three home towers. Intuitively, one wants to take out the opponent towers before that person returns the favor.

Like any tower defense game worth its salt, this one has troops (cards) of different abilities, and one has a limited, rechargeable amount of “elixir” which is used to deploy these different pieces. Deployment does two things; they can generally attack enemy installations, and may even be able to take on enemy troops that are attacking one’s home towers. Since each piece has its own attributes, and also because one has to wait for recharging (plus different pieces have different costs), one has to deploy with a semblance of strategy. Each side gets a king’s tower and two sentry towers, and protecting the king is paramount. The cards run the gamut, bringing fantastical fighting personnel to the fore.

It boils down to a timed war of attrition, if time passes without a clearly winner, the game starts a sudden death overtime period.

Cool stuff, really.

There are a lot of other pieces, like chests of goodies, the upgradeability of the cards, the ability to collect other cards and create battle sets, achievements and more. Gems and gold coins make things happen, and can be supplemented by real cash if one wants to expedite processes. Players can level up, and some things (like selecting clans) are based on one’s level.

The game does slow down, creading a faux energy requirement, but it is possible to go rounds and rounds if one is willing to forego some payouts.

Altogether, it’s an engaging caper, if a bit overwhelming; simply put, it has great appeal.

Tre Lawrence
Tech fiend that isn't too cool for ramen noodles...
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