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Pokemon TV App Now Available for Amazon Kindle Fire

Posted by on Apr 24, 2014

Pokemon TV app now available for Kindle Fire.

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Games

Soccer Rally 2 Review

Posted by on Apr 24, 2014

Soccer meets racing.

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Productivity

Carousel Review

Posted by on Apr 23, 2014

Dropbox launches a standalone media management and backup utility.

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App Rundown

Soccer Rally 2 Review

Posted by on Apr 24, 2014

Soccer meets racing.

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Recent Posts

Sonic Racing Transformed Review

Sonic Racing Transformed Review

Apr 18, 2014

When it comes to kart racing, Sonic is the man. And the hedgehog. Whatever… Sonic is the consummate console competitor, and he and his friends have done well on mobile devices too. Sonic Racing Transformed is yet another opportunity for us all to see how fast our blue bandit has come on Android OS.

It is an intense game, and definitely not for the device spec faint of heart. There are two modes off the bat, Single player and multi player, with the single optioning into the advertised new World Tour. There is also the Weekly Challenge, which allows players to compete for streaks and prizes.

In the World Tour, it’s all about racing as we know Sonic to race. The vehicles are closer to real gear than karts, but the mechanism and feel is still the same. Using optional virtual controls that are nestled in the bottom left sonic1along with the miscellaneous gear counters on other parts of the screen, the idea is to jockey for position, avoid obstacles and deployed weapons while deploying your own to thwart the competition. It’s leveled play, with success in a current level needed to unlock higher levels. One interesting aspect is the ability to play these levels at different difficult levels, with correspondingly different payouts. This makes it possible to have a semi-new feel even after cycling through a few times, as there is a tangibly different feel on different difficult levels.

The basics of Sonic racing are all present; windy, windy roads, light play, collectible goodies and more. The different racing environments are a discovery all by themselves, with creatively transformative vehicles matching the creative locations. The game employs tasks, and there are rings that can be garnered by placing well. Rings can be used to get the boosts and characters necessary to be successful, but they are in short supply.

The multiplayer option allows for folks to compete with others, local and otherwise. While the game is stated to be compatible with third-party controllers, I didn’t get an opportunity to use one.

It’s a fun piece of software; there are in-app purchases, even after purchase, but it does pack a lot of play in its fine-tuned raceways.

Humble Mobile Bundle 5 Now Available, Includes The Room Two, The Cave, and More

Humble Mobile Bundle 5 Now Available, Includes The Room Two, The Cave, and More

Apr 17, 2014

The latest Humble Mobile Bundle is now available. After the previous Humble Bundle had both PC and Android games, this latest bundle contains a variety of Android exclusives. Purchasers at any price can get open-world RPG Aralon: Sword and Shadow, retro shmup R-Type II, and the puzzle game Bag It! Those who pay over the average get Double Fine’s The Cave, hit puzzle game The Room Two, board game Carcassone, and more games when the bundle updates on Tuesday. The bundle runs through April 29th.

Tilt to Live 2: Redonkulous’ Brimstone Pinball Mode Now Available

Tilt to Live 2: Redonkulous’ Brimstone Pinball Mode Now Available

Apr 17, 2014

The day has come at last: Tilt to Live 2 finally gets the Brimstone Pinball mode. Demoed at GDC, this mode takes the brimstone ball powerup from the main game modes and makes it the main way that players will defeat their enemies in this arena survival game. Keep the ball moving to hit enemies harder, bouncing off of the active wall to unleash destructive lasers. The new mode is available as a $0.99 in-app purchase.

Noodlecake Games Brings Pivvot Creator Whitaker Trebella’s Polymer to Android at Last

Noodlecake Games Brings Pivvot Creator Whitaker Trebella’s Polymer to Android at Last

Apr 17, 2014

Pivvot from Whitaker Trebella’s Fixpoint Productions was his Android debut, but the first game he released was Polymer, a sliding puzzle game released in 2012. Now, thanks to porting maestros Noodlecake Games, Android players can take on this puzzler where the goal is to build polymer shapes from assorted connecting pieces for high scores across a variety of game modes. The game is available now on Google Play.

LG G Flex Hardware Review

LG G Flex Hardware Review

Apr 17, 2014

As we mentioned earlier, LG Electronics largely elbowed its way to Android prominence with it latest batch of devices. We had an opportunity to formally look at LG’s G Flex, and the experience was just as eye-opening.

Gotta admit, the internals are juicy. It sports a 2.26 GHz quad-core Snapdragon chip, and packs in all the radios and stuff one would expect in a high-end Android phone: Bluetooth 4.0 LE, wi-fi 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac, GPS. The cameras are definitely not slouchy, with a 13 MP autofocus snapper in the rear and a 2.1 MP unit in the back. Top of the line requisites like LTE and a 3,500 mAh battery are present to partner with the 32 GB memory.

Cool innards aside, the physical presentation is where it will most likely stand out initially for most. It cuts an imposing figure, and wears the label “phablet” (yeah, I said it) quite well, embodied in the 6.32″ x 3.21″ x 0.31″ flex2 and stated 6.24-ounces frame. But it’s The Curve that visually defines this phone. The phone features a tangible parabola that tapers uncompromising into the 1280 x 720, 6″ HD flexible OLED Gorilla Glassed display.

The device is sleek, with its signature curved chassis and slim profile being easy on the eyes. The USB port is centered at the bottom, and the sides are delightfully bereft of buttons, as the ON button is placed on the back. The grey finishing defines it quite well, and the device feels natural in the right hand despite its non-diminutive size.

And y’all just have to forgive me for getting a bit caught up in the screen. It’s supposed to be indicative of the future of curved displays, a feature that is supposed to be enhance the enjoyment quotient. Coupled with the excellent screen, the whole structure does seem to work, though I feel those looking for something that changes the fabric of life as we know it might be a little let down. In other words, the flexible screen (along with the self-healing capabilities of the back) works well, but might not yet be a set-apart feature just yet.

The software suite also sets it apart. There is the needed Google suite, but above and beyond, that LG makes the crafty (and daresay, necessary) move to ensure customers have an opportunity to get immersed in LG’s massive consumer electronics ecosystem. Like the G Pad, the Flex works with other select LG devices and electronics. Miracast compatibility is another plus, and the device comes upgradeable to Android KitKat. In real-life use, the device is quite fluid, and doesn’t stutter under heavy lifting, and everything runs smooth.

Pauses? Folks coming from the G2 or other bigger flagships, might not be as enamored; I would have loved a bigger battery, and I will whine about available accessories. Still, it’s the first phablet I have ever wanted to be around for an extended period of time.

Trust me… that says a lot.

Turn-Based Game Bomb Buds Coming Soon to Android

Turn-Based Game Bomb Buds Coming Soon to Android

Apr 17, 2014

Bomb Buds 3

Bomb Buds is a turn-based strategy game, much akin to ye olde Worms franchise. There are several teams that are situated on randomly generated bits of land, and wield a mighty arsenal, shared between the team. The task is to eliminate the other team, moving one team member at a turn. The game is available for iOS, but will soon be released for Android devices as well. For more details, go here: Bomb Buds on Facebook.

Instantion Review

Instantion Review

Apr 17, 2014

Where is Dolly the Sheep when one needs her? Instation brings cloning to Android, and the replicated pieces make even the best line dancers look quaint by comparison.

The gameplay is leveled; in this one, we get a blue, somewhat luminescent running being, intent on doing what most platform side-scrolling runners want to do: run from left to right. The scenery had a touch of the futuristic tinged with a the ominous feel one gets from the occasional red lasers and bright obstacles that add context to game functions.

In its simplest form, the running creature meets obstacles. There is a jump button, direction buttons and an interaction button, with last being useful to toggle gates open or to assemble bridges. There are also green step instant1pads that also toggle gates open and shut. As the gameplay unfolds, the obstacles get trickier; what is one to do do when the switch for a bridge is on other side?

Here’s where cloning becomes valuable. Our humanoid has the ability to create exact copies of itself when fully charged, and the clones can be placed (via intricate and sometimes infuriating sighting process) where they need to be as long as the point is not too far away.

The interesting part is how the humanoid and the clones act; they do everything in unison… jumping, running left or right… everything the “true” unit does is mimicked in time simultaneously by the clones, unless restricted by an object or obstacle. This adds a completely different feel to the gameplay, especially in further levels. For example, the aforementioned energy fields reduce clones even when only the main unit goes through them. At one point, solving the puzzle of advancement means inching back and forth, while allowing obstacles to adjust the natural movement of the clones, until the target can be reached without going through the laser.

Finishing a level quickly is the goal, and each run is graded.

It comes together quite nicely, even if I think the game could do with a tutorial, as I spent some time spinning my wheels.

Puzzles. Running. Teleporters. Multiples. Welcome to gaming in the 21st century.

Disco Zoo Review

Disco Zoo Review

Apr 16, 2014

Disco Zoo is somewhat of an all-rounder. It’s chunky pixels are the perfect call to the joys contained within.

One of the biggest attributes of the game is the more-or-less logical flow. It is a management sim, and as such, there are resources, and a need to spend those resources wisely to expand.

As the tutorial cycles through, the player gets a bank of coins, which is useful to procure the vehicles and animals needed to make the gameplay work. Some elements are linked; for example, buying one hot air balloon unlocks the farm, and other unlocks and upgrades are affected by other factors such as number of animals and such.

And procuring animals to keep zoo animals patron paying for acess and tips is ultimately the name of the game. The first step is to “rescue” the animals from different habitats, but different habitats need different vehicles. Thedisco1 aforementioned hot air balloon is the bottom tier vehicle, and good for simple animals. To get more exotic animals, a better flying vehicle is needed to get to the outback, for instance. Well, to get that money to get the better vehicle, one needs to rescue the easy local ones.

Rescuing is a whole new element in and of itself; basically, there is a grid made up of smaller squares, and the operation plays out like reverse Minesweeper: locate the animals hidden underneath before running out of tries. To rescue a kangaroo, for instance, there are four kangaroo images hidden in a standard order; getting all four in ten tries gains the animal, which in turn gains money for the zoo operation. To move on to savanna animals, more money is needed, and so on. There are also coins to be gained from these searches. As new animals are garnered, more of the zoo is developed to accommodate them.

The game is enjoyable because it doesn’t require real cash, though it can be used if needed; there’s even the option to watch ads to get extra rescue attempts. The animals yield payouts every so often, and the rate can be increased by rescuing more of the same type. Animals go to sleep, and have to me wakened to earn money, but Disco Events can be organized (for a cost) that not only keep the animals awake, but yield more coins.

It’s an engaging game; it does require some amount of attention, and feels overly easy in parts, but it’s a fun game that can be tailored to fit individual and changing interest levels

Need Some Interesting Retro-Styled Ouya Games? Check Out This List from Rob Fearon, AKA @retroremakes

Looking for some good retro-styled games for Ouya? Well, why not take the word of the man who goes by the Twitter handle @retroremakes, Rob Fearon? The creator of Death Ray Manta and War Daddy is also a regular curator of interesting titles, and he has come up with an interesting list of retro-style Ouya titles that include some straight-up remakes and a variety of iterations on classic concepts. Check out the list on his site.

New Screenshots and Trailer for Gameloft’s The Amazing Spider-Man 2 are Available

New Screenshots and Trailer for Gameloft’s The Amazing Spider-Man 2 are Available

Apr 15, 2014

TheAmazingSpiderMan2_BlackCat

As The Amazing Spider-Man 2 from Gameloft is reaching release, more information becomes available about return of the masked superhero on mobiles. The story and gameplay will closely follow the movie as the player will get to swing around New York, beat bad guys and participate in other crime-fighting actions. Mor details can be found here:

Astray Review

Astray Review

Apr 15, 2014

With wearables and smartphones hitting the next level, and hardware components that are beginning to match standalone counterparts, games like Astray are inevitable. Or at least, they should be.

Astray is an interesting, augmented reality-assisted labyrinth game that touches on some interesting gameplay elements. The game walkthrough underscores some of the highlights, and ties in the important aspects together.

It would be a disservice to not lead with the fact that Astray is a 3D labyrinth game at heart; there is the maze, the metal sphere and the target location. The environment could be described as vaguely medieval, with a relatively well designed background imagery. Labyrinth core concepts are present: obstacles, gates and such. The dangers include stuff like colored portals that end the level unsuccessfully if the sphere falls into them.

The key part of the game is the picture; indeed, the gameplay starts with image acquisition. The first part of astray1setting up a game is taking a flat object (a piece of paper, a large envelope, etc.) and getting it within the program sights. It gives a visual score of how good the image is (with three stars being the best), and then, the game uses the object as a movable part of the game. The trick is that instead of moving the device, you keep it stationary, and use the underlying paper to guide the sphere to the right hole. Progress is timed, and solving one puzzle opens the next.

The game is well thought out idea. However, in practice, some things felt a bit weird. One thing was the picture taking mechanism; it seemed quite picky. The other issue is that by default, I ended up holding two things in the air with each hand, which can be uncomfortable over time, especially since I was using a tablet.

This is one game that I feel is worth waiting for, and the developers seem responsive (having already fixed a gripe I had in the last update). It’s free and interesting; how can one not like it?

Big kudos with regards to the musical score, one of which I understand was performed on a penny whistle by the lead developer.

Introducing Scanbot, a Mobile Document Scanner

Introducing Scanbot, a Mobile Document Scanner

Apr 15, 2014

Scanbot 2

Scanbot is a software that can scan any document, be it a receipt, business card, meeting minute, whiteboard note, or newspaper article, and produce a high-quality PDF on the fly. Naturally, you have to have a proper camera in your phone or tablet for that. The app can be purchased here: Scanbot on Google Play.

Lost Light Review

Lost Light Review

Apr 15, 2014

Lost Light is a game from Disney with a familiar feel that sill manages to surprise in a pleasant way

It’s a matching game with a twist. Instead of matching by color as a lot do, Lost Light puzzles the player by incorporating numbers into leveled gameplay, with success at the opener of further levels.

The tutorial lays it out with its helpful squirrel by going through some of the sequences and playing methodology. The playing area has a darkish background, with numbered squares rising to the top gradually from the bottom. Using gestures, one looks to swipe groups of numbered squares to dissolve them as long as needed; if the column makes it to the top, the level is failed, so even if the the wanted sequence isn’t available, blasting squares to prevent the column from getting to the top might be good strategy from time to time. lost1

With regards to the gestures, swiping adjacent sets of the numbers is the general idea. If the game spits out a “4″ to collect, the player must then swipe through four lines of adjacent four squares to meet the goal. As the levels progress, the challenges (and associated time limit) get a bit tighter, with sequences that become a bit more varied. Of course, quick thinking and pinpoint connections are needed. There was the one where a point threshold has to be met in a set time. I loved the occasional ability to multi-swipe past the number needed to do more at once (this almost needs to be done to be understood).

There are powerups to help with the arcade feel.

All in all, it’s a simple game with plenty of puzzling and potential strategizing that makes it worth the sub-$2.00 price. Unfortunately, the game information states not all levels are free, which might cause some consternation, but it’s a good game nonetheless.

Twin Moons from G5 is Free for the Next Week

Twin Moons from G5 is Free for the Next Week

Apr 15, 2014

Twin Moons 4

Twin Moons is a hidden objects adventure by G5 in which a scientist discovers a parallel world that can give people superpowers. G5 is giving it for free for the next week, so if you want to play this spooky puzzle, download it from here: Twin Moon on Google Play.

Lyne Review

Lyne Review

Apr 15, 2014

Lyne is just what the doctor ordered.

The gameplay provides what I would describe as a gentle challenge over increasingly difficult levels. Matching and connecting are the root elements of the game, but even more enjoyable is the puzzle-solving aspect.

This is one of those games that is best explained by actually playing it. The opening helpers are especially brief, but do give an idea of the control set and playing methods. Basically, there are similarly shaped 2D objects (squares, diamonds and triangles) in the grid that comprises the posting area; matching like colors by swipe gestures completes the riddle.

It gets trickier when multiple colors/shapes are in the grid. At this point, the “end” units become more apparent; these are white-dotted pieces that more-or-less start and end the swiping motion, and their are guiding paths to lyne1help frame the allowed movement, and swipes light up the paths. Crisscrossed swipes are not allowed, and the game engine gradually gets more complex to force thought to be applied to solutions.

Soon, light blue octagon “junctions” (as I refer to them) begin to appear. The junctions have jokes in them, and can be helpful in bridging matching shapes, but all the available holes need to be filled for the puzzle to be solved. In this, the junction units bring the game a whole new, engaging angle without overly changing the general gameplay; figuring out how to double back within the rules and get through a junction piece the required number of times can be quite battle.

When a level is complete, the pieces flash bright white, and more levels are opened; levels can be repeated infinitely. this easy pace is yet another enjoyable aspect.

For the easy-going gamer, Lyne is an answered prayer. It’s a lullaby that relaxes without knocking one out, and is able to toe the delicate line of calm and challenging without tipping over into boring and infuriating.

It’s $2.50 on the Play Store.

Temple Run 2 Gets Festive Update for Easter, and Will Soon Support Cloud Saves

Temple Run 2‘s celebrating Easter with a fresh new update for every platform it’s on, including Android. Have the characters wear festive bunny ears. Collect eggs instead of coins. Spin the “Save Me Wheel” to receive prizes at the end of a run. As well, the Android version will soon be getting cloud saving, so that the temples can be ran on phones, tablets, microconsoles, wherever! Expect that functionality to launch next week, but the Easter-themed update is available now.