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Rush Rally Gets Major Update.

Posted by on Sep 1, 2014

Brownmonster, the boffins behind the enjoyable rally racer Rush Rally have cracked out a huge update for their already fun game. The update contains three new cars to throw around...

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Games

Transport Empire Review

Posted by on Sep 1, 2014

Transport Empire: Its on rails!

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Productivity

Notepad Reminder Review

Posted by on Aug 27, 2014

Notepad Reminder widget could be exactly what you need

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App Rundown

Transport Empire Review

Posted by on Sep 1, 2014

Transport Empire: Its on rails!

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Recent Posts

Crowdfunding Spotlight: Boss Monster: Dungeon

Crowdfunding Spotlight: Boss Monster: Dungeon

Aug 22, 2014

Boss Monster is a physical card game that was successfully funded on KickStarter, and has since gained a substantial following in the gaming community. The game is quite revolutionary and turns the traditional dungeon crawling genera on its head by putting the player into the role of the evil villain who is tasked with building as treacherous a dungeon as possible. These are then invaded by well-meaning adventurers at the end of each turn, and the winner is the player who has the last “Boss” standing.

While I have no personal experience with the game, it seems to be beloved by fans and because of its inventive premise it is something I could really see myself getting into. The crowdfunding project we are shining the spotlight on today is the attempt by the developer of Boss Monster, Brotherwise Games, to build a digital version for the iPad and Android tablets. Having spent considerable time with the Magic: The Gathering app for the iPad recently I understand how well these tabletop games can translate onto the large tablet screen.

It makes sense for Brotherwise Games to be creating this app at this moment, as the ubiquitous accessibility, as well as the spontaneous nature, of app stores can greatly increase their footprint and create a larger legion of Boss Monster fans. I will admit that I was not initially sold on the initial card game KickStarter, but with the addition of a cheaper and more convenient mobile app the odds of me investing in Boss Monster has definitely increased. Included in the game is the ability to battle against up to three AI opponents, and this feature is essential for a card game who’s main draw is head to head competition.

The first thing that struck me while perusing through the KickStarter page is how the app easily conveys the atmosphere of the retro dungeon crawlers it is based off of. The graphic design is spot on, and the audio, which is being recorded by a professional studio, is nearly indistinguishable from late-90s PC adventure games. As of the time of writing, Boss Monster is over halfway to their $85,000 goal; so please, considering supporting this innovative game and its incredible developers by visiting their project page and possibly earning some cool limited edition digital cards in the process.

Freaking Math Review

Freaking Math Review

Aug 22, 2014

Simple games often thrive on phones. The format just suits simple games that can be played for minutes or even seconds when there’s a quiet moment or passing a phone between friends, trying to beat each other’s record. Freaking Math takes simplicity and files it down into something even more simple that simple. The result is a pretty damn simple game that looks like it took a few minutes to make, but is addictive, tough and a bit of fun.

Screenshot_2014-08-16-05-25-00Freaking Math is aptly described by its title. It makes you say f…reaking a lot and it is math. A series of sums appear on a colored screen that may be correct or incorrect. They are always very simple, elementary math level problems, such as 1+1=2 or 2+3=4. There is a tick and a cross button and the object is to tap the button to say whenever the sum is correct or not before time runs out, much like the little known 1977 Atari 2600 game Basic Math. Easy right? The catch is the time limit is literally one second. Taking more than one second to answer the sum or answering it wrong ends the game and displays the high score. The game is hard so games rarely last more than a minute and the game has a distinctly Flappy Bird-ish vibe to it, what with its super simple presentation and short game length.

The game gets harder the longer it is played and there are a series of achievements to shoot for, showcasing the rare players that can make it to 200 correct guesses. A high score list is also provided.

Screenshot_2014-08-16-05-23-11Despite seeming like a bad idea for a game, Freaking Math is addictive because of its challenge and how quick it is to play. Anyone who has played Flappy Bird will know the slightly masochistic tendencies that game tends to bring out in its players and Freaking Math is similar. The game is free and there are no irritating ads or anything in get in the way of its sole idea.

Freaking Math looks very basic. Graphically it consists of white text on brightly coloured screens with a large pair of buttons with a cross and a tick. This stark presentation is all that’s needed though and leaves no room for excuses about being unable to see or missing a button. The sound is limited to a click for a new game, a fanfare for getting one correct and a bzzt for losing. Get ready to hear that one a lot.

Freaking Math is simultaneously one of the easiest and hardest games on Android and perfect for a few moments with friends or just to work your brain a little. It is a testament to how just about anything can be made into a game and work well.

BANDAI NAMCO Releases New Game PAC-MAN Friends to Android

BANDAI NAMCO Releases New Game PAC-MAN Friends to Android

Aug 22, 2014

Prolific Android publisher BANDAI NAMCO has unveiled another title in PAC-MAN Friends. In this game, PAC-MAN characters take on mazes in their quest to escape from Ghost Castle.

From the press release:

BANDAI NAMCO Games America Inc. put out a gameplay feast today with the launch of PAC-MAN© Friends, an original arcade-style action-puzzler starring gaming’s most historic characters. This new experience, featuring an engrossingly challenging campaign, new characters with dynamic abilities and a buffet of control mechanics from which to choose, is available to download now on iOS and Android devices.

The mazes of PAC-MAN© Friends require sharp wit and fast reflexes to survive. As PAC-MAN chomps his way through 95 levels across seven different worlds, he’ll have to rescue his eight allies and put their unique powers to use to escape the haunted corridors of Ghosts’ Castle. Running into obstacles like Blinky or his ghastly underlings – Pinky, Inky and Clyde – will cost PAC-MAN a life, but diverse power boosts and the special skills of his buddies will help PAC-MAN turn the tide from prey to predator.

PAC-MAN© Friends is bursting with retro-inspired artwork and design, harnessing the feel of classic PAC-MAN titles balanced with vibrant colors, animations and Retina display support for a crisp, clean look. Daily rewards and the freedom to challenge friends for high score supremacy keep the adventure fresh and exciting long after the Ghosts have been exorcised.

PAC-MAN Friends is available for free (with in-app purchases) on the Play Store.

Swype Update Brings Premium MLS Themes and More

Swype Update Brings Premium MLS Themes and More

Aug 21, 2014

Swype Keyboard, the award-winning third-party keyboard from Nuance Communications, has just received an update, and it most probably will be a welcome one for fans of Major League Soccer.

Most notably, there are a host of new premium keyboard themes based on MLS teams, so users can now deck their keyboards in the distinct colors and crest of their favorite soccer team.

The MLS-branded themes can be unlocked for $1.99 each. The standard, stock themes remain.

Version 1.6.19 also brings:

Significant UI updates and improvements for all themes
Many bug fixes and optimizations
Updated default Korean dictionary
Fixed missing Pinyin delimiter on Pinyin keyboard
Fixed crashes reported by users

We had an opportunity to review Swype when it was first released, and liked it a lot; it is available for $0.99 on the Play Store (with a full-fledged 30-day trial available as well).

Unpossible Review

Unpossible Review

Aug 21, 2014

I’m an emotional mess, and it’s all because of Unpossible.

On paper, it’s a racing game, but it goes a bit beyond the basic paradigm. It starts from the intro screen, with the dazzling blue interspersed with dark undertones. The background cityscape is bathed in moonlight, and the electric feel is almost tangible in the way it invokes the night. The raceway is a blue-lined dark, tubular affair that extends in seemingly unending fashion over barren land.

Starting the game hints at the play style; it’s possible to control the motion by tilting or touch controls. The view is first person, and we have no idea of what is being raced, and frankly, it doesn’t really matter in this un1action affair. As soon as a run is started, the hosting device “becomes” the screen, and the device starts down the raceway at high speed. Now, it’s silly to expect no obstacles, and this is far from a silly game; different pieces appear in the path, and it is necessary to guide oneself around the lane to avoid them, as hitting one of them ends the run.

The measuring stick is the time one remains alive; easier said than done though, because this is where the delightful insanity of the gameplay becomes apparent. The longer one survives, the more frenetic the pace becomes. The developer uses simple but logical tools to force players to test reflexes. For instance, when the raceway arcs, one has a tougher time seeing ahead, and quicker moves are necessary to stay alive. There are different levels, but to unlock them, there are thresholds; for instance, the first level, Simplicity, is the default, unless one can make it 60 seconds to unlock the next level, and so on.

The latent strength of the game is its ability to draw out such a range of emotions: rage, joy, peace, disappointment… all wrapped up in addiction. It’s that good.

Someday, we’ll find out games like this are bad for us. I mean, who needs this type of crazy jolt on a daily basis? Till then, strap yourself in. It’s a crazy ride.

LG G3 Hardware Review

LG G3 Hardware Review

Aug 21, 2014

It’s the LG G3. Need one say more? Some reviews are just meant to be.

The device is a relative powerhouse, with a 2.5 GHz Quad-core Snapdragon processor; the Sprint variant we received packs 3GB of RAM, and has expandable memory that can take advantage of those otherworldly 128GB microSD cards. The 3000 mAh battery is user-replaceable, and the device has a 13 MP snapper in the rear and a 2.1 MP for videochat and selfies. All these under-the-hood goodies fit into the 5.76 x 2.94 x 0.35 inch frame, and the whole unit weighs a slight 5.26 ounces.

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Physically, the device feels exceptionally light in hand. The 5.5-inch Gorilla Glass LCD display allows for a small, logo-bearing bezel at the bottom of the front, and a prominent speaker grill shares space with the front-facing camera on the top front of the device. The bottom houses the 3.5 mm audio port and micro-USB port, and the sides are interestingly bereft of buttons as, is the top. For returning LG fans, this won’t be too alarming, because they’d probably be aware of LG’s design paradigm which calls for the back of the device to be used. It works well here, with the on button sandwiched by volume controls right under the rear camera.

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But back to the screen. It actually feels as though folks might continually turn the device off… if just to turn on the device again. It’s a vivid temptress, and seems especially happy to sow off its 1440 x 2560p credentials. If one has never had the urge to consume media on a handheld, this might just have one trying.

The device comes with Android 4.4.2, which is expected, and sports LG’s skin, which is not displeasing. Some of the tweaks that are incorporated and shown during setup are simple but engaging. Take the knock code, for instance, which allows one to set a pattern with which to wake the device. That’s smart. How about the ability to configure the virtual button layout and presentation? Nice touch. I especially liked the picture quality, even though I think the lasers are more buzzy than truly functional.

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One exceptionally useful feature is the dual window functionality. We’ve seen this on other devices, and LG’s implementation is no less impressive, it allows the device user to have two apps run simultaneously, as in “YouTube-running-in-the-back-while-searching-Chrome-for-lyrics-in-the-forefront” simultaneously It works well, is easily toggled, and brings extra multitasking to an already stocked device. The obviously gripe is the relatively limited number of apps that work with this feature.

Now, folks who have handled the flagship device of one Android OEM in particular might feel a bit shafted by the materials used in this device. Still, it’s insane not to think it’s one of the top devices on the market now, and fully worthy of superstar status.

Barnes & Noble and Samsung Release Collaborative Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK

Barnes & Noble and Samsung Release Collaborative Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK

Aug 20, 2014

Barnes & Noble and Samsung have released their previously announced joint project: the Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK.

The new offering has a 7-inch display that looks to merge web use and e-reading by bringing NOOK features to the Galaxy Tab line. It is a wi-fi tablet that comes in white or black, with 8 GB of on-board memory that is expandable up to 32 GB via SD card. It also has a GPS chip and has a camera each on the front and back. It will have access to Google apps and the NOOK Store as well.

Barnes & Noble CEO Michael Huseby invites people to come try the new device out. “The Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK is the most advanced NOOK ever, delivering the great NOOK experience our customers have come to love, with the high-performance tablet features they’ve asked for,” he says. “We invite reading and entertainment fans to visit their local Barnes & Noble store to experience the new Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK. Once they do, we’re certain they will make this innovative device part of their daily routine.”

The Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK is available for sale at Barnes & Noble online and brick and mortar locations for $179 (with instant rebate).

[Source: Barnes & Noble/Samsung press release via Business Wire]

2K Releases New WWE Themed Card Game On Android

2K Releases New WWE Themed Card Game On Android

Aug 20, 2014

2K let it be known today that a new CCG based on the oiled up, lycra wearing spectacle that is the WWE has been unleashed on Android. Known as WWE Supercard, players can build up a deck of their favorite faces and heels to virtually virtually (geddit?) beat up other player’s stables of superstars. Both exhibition and King of the Ring modes are available. The whole idea sounds strangely awesome, even if the screenshot of two cardboard squares dancing in a ring is just a little goofy.

Players can purchase additional cards of “common” or “epic” rarity for the equivalent of about a dollar, the minimum purchase price is $1.99 and “super rare” cards can be had for $25 a pop.

You can count on Android Rundown to have a review up in the next few days to tell you exactly whenever this is worth tagging in.

Brave Tribe Review

Brave Tribe Review

Aug 19, 2014

Brave Tribe is another freemuiem citybuilder, but this one tells the story of a small Celtic village completely surrounded by Romans who like their food and a good fight. If this sounds familiar it sure is. The opening cutscene has a lot of homages to a certain heroic little Gaul and there is even a Monty Python reference squeezed in there.

Screenshot_2014-08-14-09-30-11All this personality pretty much disappears when the game begins though. Taking control of a nearly featureless village, the player must build it up into a stronghold capable of supporting stronger warriors and defeating the encroaching Romans. Fighting off the Romans is as simple as tapping on them a few times though at least after the player has waited an hour or two to produce swords. A few basic quests provide direction and additional things to tap on.

Brave Tribe suffers from the typically slower pace of games of this type. BT however is much slower than others because of its food system. Food is required as fuel for any building or object in the game to work. Including farms. Buildings that generate money, such as farms, banquet tables, and such require food to function. This means before anything else the player must plant food in one of the player’s four fields and wait at least 5 minutes for the fastest crop or 2 hours for crops that provide enough for a few buildings at once.

Screenshot_2014-08-14-08-31-31After waiting, the player taps the crops to harvest them (a 5 second process) and then uses the food to create swords or get a building producing resources. This leads to another long wait from 5 minutes to a few hours while the building ticks away. At the end of that the player can finally harvest the small amount of coins or the needed item from that building and the cycle starts anew. This means that players need to generally wait twice for any object. Players should count themselves lucky if they can interact with anything in Brave Tribe more than a few times a day.

Brave Tribe’s tedious “gameplay” isn’t helped by some of the most exasperating ads this reviewer has yet experienced in a mobile app. When the app is started it displays a screen with links to G5’s other games and a “play now” button for Brave Tribe, rather than just starting the app. There is an ad for other games permanently displayed in game and the game nags you to turn on notifications. Lastly, the 5th quest received is to rate the game in the Playstore. In a game that makes the player wait constantly unless they play money. Rarely is a game so overbearing and downright asinine with its marketing. Annoying doesn’t even begin to describe it.

Brave Tribe is redeemed slightly by its graphics. Clear, colorful and cartoonish they mesh well with the game’s harmonious music and basic but fitting sound effects.

Without a doubt Brave Tribe is some of the least fun it’s possible to have on Android. With a boring and annoying building system, incredibly slow progress and absolutely no thinking required Brave Tribe is not worth playing

Ludomotion Launches New Game SUMICO at Gamescom

Ludomotion Launches New Game SUMICO at Gamescom

Aug 19, 2014

With help from Vlambeer’s Rami Ismail, Ludomotion recently launched its new puzzler SUMICO right on the floor at Gamescom.

Excerpts from the informational email:

Vlambeer’s Rami Ismail just minutes ago pushed the button to officially launch Ludomotion’s new number puzzler SUMICO for Android.

SUMICO is an addictive numbers game for mobile, developed by a journalist and a game developer. It is released for Android, the iOS release will follow in September.

Ismail was among the first developers to play the original prototype and provided the SUMICO creators with loads of valuable feedback.

Ismail: “I’m super honoured to have a developer ask me to launch their game. Helps that I’ve been playing the game for a few weeks already.”

SUMICO is available for free (with optional in-app purchases) on the Play Store; the launch trailer is below.

Targus City Fusion Messenger Bag Hardware Review

Targus City Fusion Messenger Bag Hardware Review

Aug 19, 2014

As we are wont to say, one can have the best-fitting device in the world, with the coolest accessories, companion gadgets and backup devices to boot: chargers, USB cables, and more.

Yep, it is possible to be the consummate mobile professional, but what good are all the gadgets and tools if one doesn’t have a serious, flexible way of toting them around? Enter the City Fusion Laptop Messenger from Targus. Targus isn’t exactly an unknown commodity with regards to computer accessories, and with the current push for increased mobility, it only makes sense that there would be some pleasant overlap.

The gray piece we reviewed has interior dimensions of 14.75 x 10.25 x 1.53 inches is concealed in the 16.5 x 12 x 4.75 inch exterior and weighs less than 2.5 lbs. Most of the outside is coated in smooth gray canvas, with leather trim in pertinent areas (including the bottom). The very front of the bag has some stylish leather straps which are unashamedly cosmetic and distract from the snaps the truly hold the front flap in place, and the back of the bag has an easy access slot that uses velcro for fastening. There is also a single hand strap embedded towards the top, and a shoulder strap that allows the messenger to be used in “traditional” manner.

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Opening the bag is more fun than it should be. The “main” compartment is fairly large, and fully capable of storing larger notebooks and holding such in place via strap. In this portion, there also three pouches built into the front-facing end, perfect for knick-knacks and stuff like USB cables. Behind this area is a soft-lined area that is great for tablets and such. The third main area has a fastener. The entire interior is well laid out, and tailor-made for organized transportation; there’s even a key-hook in the middlemost portion.

I almost missed the zippered area right under the front flap. In my book, there’s nothing like too many storage compartments.

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So… it looks good, has all the cool pieces and such, but what about real life usage? Of course I took it for a spin. I packed in the 15″ laptop, added in a phablet, tablet, cables, backup chargers, portable hard-drive, wireless keyboard, and some Altoids. I was able to pack these all in comfortably, without any unsightly bulges, and the bag is even able to stand upright on its own.

Even though all my gear fits — and then some — I would have loved to see something like smaller, secured pouch for SD memory or a jump drive, and a dedicated option for laptop cable. Yes, I’m being persnickety.

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Not all messenger bags are created equal. The City Fusion may not have the sexy look of the high-end all-leather options, but it eschews the premium price, too. It’s better than basic, and for most purposes, that ma be just okay.

The City Fusion is available from Amazon for $49.00

Point and click with Bik!

Point and click with Bik!

Aug 18, 2014

Bik a humorous, retro styled Space Quest homage has landed on Android. With a charmingly archaic graphical style and equal parts venerable point and clickery and aliens with baked bean shaped heads It looks like a winner. “I Can’t Do That Here” indeed.

Bik is set to become a walk down memory lane for long term gamers, and at 99c it wont break the bank. Look for a full review of this one very soon.

Baseball General Manager 2014 Review

Baseball General Manager 2014 Review

Aug 18, 2014

Baseball General Manager 2014 is extremely light on actual management. Players expecting something even remotely as complex and fulfilling as Football Manger will be sorely disappointed. BGM plays more like a social game than anything else.

BGM2104’s gameplay is extremely simple. Players play games by simply tapping on play then choose an opponent. The game then randomly determines though pure team value who wins. Player level doesn’t seem to make much difference it is simply about who has the more valuable team. Energy is expended by playing and players can be trained which increases their value slightly, making the team stronger. That is the extent of BGM14’s gameplay.

Screenshot_2014-08-15-07-09-56There are no tactical options. Forget about even the simplest tactical options such as reorganizing your outfielders or pinching hitters. None of that happens because playing games in BGM simply involves tapping the “play” button and then a screen appearing telling the player whenever they won or lost.

There is no gameplay or management whatsoever. Signing new players is ridiculous as well. Players have no attributes. The only thing that matters is their value compared to other players. Higher value players make it easier to win. Signing new players simply involves bidding on a randomly selected group of players and hoping other players don’t outbid you. Any player of management games knows that scouting for and signing promising players is one of the most fun parts of the game, so this is a disappointment.

Screenshot_2014-08-15-04-42-13It is really a wonder that the MLB endorses this game as there isn’t even the barest vestiges of tactics available for matches. It captures none of the flair of baseball. It simply is not a management game at all.

Because this a freemium game, there are plenty of pay to win buffs as well, such as sport drinks that prevent training progress from mysteriously disappearing and just buying additional currency with real money.

Baseball General Manager 2014 is also distinctly unpolished. There is no sound at all, the interface looks cheap like a Facebook game and the message centre headings are inexplicably in Mexican rather than English. Server errors are common. The game as a whole is laggy despite being simple text and pictures. Training sometimes just plain doesn’t work unless you restart the app as it failed to unlock. Baseball General Manager 2014 just feels amateurish.

Baseball General Manager 2014 is not a management game at all and is not worth playing in the slightest. Fans of sport management have one choice on Android and that choice can only be Football Manger 2014. Grab that for a far, far more satisfying sporting experience.

Transport Tycoon Review

Transport Tycoon Review

Aug 18, 2014

Transport Tycoon is a well tweaked blast from the past that allows the player to build a transport empire from the ground up. Is it a wheely good time?

transporttycoon02This version of Transport Tycoon is actually not based on the original TT, but an older game known as Locomotion, also by the legendary Tom Sawyer. The basic idea is still the same though: the player starts in a land full of factories, coal mines and towns must construct a robust transport network to get goods where they need to be and passengers to their destination and make as much money doing it as possible.

To do this the player begins by constructing roads and railways if needed then the stations and depots for their vehicles. Goods can be shifted by a fleet of buses or trucks, but the real money is in a high quality rail network. This can shift massive loads of resources across vast distances quickly.

Screenshot_2014-08-12-23-09-20For example: the player sets up a small rail network to deliver coal and ore from mines to a steel mill. A truck station is built nearby and a fleet of trucks begin transporting the valuable metal to a nearby factory. The factory then creates goods, which are loaded onto a ship and shipped to a distant town on the other side of the map. That town has an airport, shunting passengers to another distant town and back in their passenger jets, raking in the cash. Of course other companies are out there vying for a bigger piece of the cargo pie. TT is all about building infrastructure in such a way that transport using it travels as quickly as possible.

TT has a great control system. A great touch based interface replaces the mouse cursor of yore and building global transport networks is a snap. A solid tutorial eases the player into the game as well.

Transport Tycoon features lots of fun scenarios, which range from making certain amount of profit to reaching a certain company rating. The large number of scenarios helps give the game focus and provide fun challenges.

Transport Tycoon has a few caveats, however. Road vehicles really need rebalancing as they carry little cargo and have a hard time paying for themselves. Trains and aircraft are much more efficient, so there is rarely a need to have a large road based network, which is a bummer for those who would like to try making a trucking company. The game also lacks an easy way to replace aging vehicles, so the player periodically has to trawl though their few dozen vehicles looking for superseded or unreliable older models.

The most major problem however is the rather broken way laying rail and road works. The game is incapable of levelling tertian without player input and even the slightest sideways slope or uneven land forbids anything being built on it. Laying a long stretch of rail to one area of the map to another usually involves fixing 15-20 squares of land at the least in lots of either 1 or 4. This was a major problem in the original game as well. Players of SimCity will be very frustrated.

Still Transport Tycoon retains all the depth and satisfying strategic gameplay the original had and with an active development forum and a driven fanbase the game can only get better.

Kingston MobileLite Wireless G2 Card Reader Hardware Review

Kingston MobileLite Wireless G2 Card Reader Hardware Review

Aug 15, 2014

Years ago, as an upcoming tech feen, I reached a major milestone. I was rocking the awesome Palm Tungsten T5, was proclaiming publicly about preferring my phone and PDA devices separate, and enjoyed the PalmOS-WinMo wars. Then, one fateful day, I found a huge sale going on. It was for a then-massive 1GB Kingston SD card that could help me expand the T5 with ginormous external space.

I had to sign up for Google Checkout, which helped tie me in further to the Google ecosystem. That card literally opened up a new world to me, and I learned Kingston is a brand worth using. Since then, the company has expanded along with the entire mobile sector, and has stuff out like its MobileLite Wireless G2 Card Reader.

With regards to mobility, this device makes a lot of sense. It is an update to the original MobileLite Wireless G1; in theory, it allows for folks to access data from SD, micro SD cards and USB sticks on the go via the device’s built-in network. On paper, this can be useful functionality to have whether or not one has a device with external storage capabilities.

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But all the theoretical functionality is moot if the device isn’t, well, portable. The review package came with the main unit, USB cable and an SD card adapter and paperwork (Kingston also provided a 64 GB micro-SD card to fully test the unit). The MobileLite thankfully doesn’t carry a huge physical footprint, being similar in size visually to the HTC One that was used it with; officially, it comes in at 5 x 3.1 x 0.75 inches and 6.03 ounces. The device is mostly black with stark white band frame around the sides; the sides houseLED icons, power button, a reset hole and micro-USB port on the one long side, and a full ethernet port on the opposite long side. On the opposite side, one finds a slot for full SD cad and a full USB port too. All in all, it feels well-fused, and is infinitely pocketable.

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To use it, we charged it up and fired it on, and then we downloaded the companion Kingston MobileLite app from the Play Store. The app provides an interface to connect to the device’s wi-fi network. Connecting it was finicky at first, but it fixed itself, and after that it was fairly easy to use.

While connected, the unit shows the internal memory of the device on its network. The external memory card wasn’t an option, but the onboard memory shows, and it’s possible to move data back and forth. It officially supports, FAT, exFat, NFTS and FAT32, so that is one less thing to worry about. I especially like the streaming functionality that allows for one to access media directly from the card reader. It can also be used as a wi-fi bridge via the ethernet port, and even works as a mobile charger (we found it works best with a full charge; it was able to recharge the HTC almost two times).

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One can’t help but love products that do what they do well, and take on extra functionality; this is where the MobileLite excels. At $54.00 (per Amazon), it isn’t prohibitively priced either, especially when one considers the Kingston name.

The Room Review

The Room Review

Aug 15, 2014

Mobile gamers rarely get to experience truly innovating games. Most of the high-quality titles are simply good at copying others. The Room is an incredible exception to that fact, as it’s the most fun and unusual quest I’ve played in several years.

The subject of The Room is a series of intricate and impossibly complex locked cabinets, containing clues about a mysterious discovery the player character needs to uncover. The game quite literally revolves around these lockers. The player needs to move the camera around the locker and try to unlock all of its locks, clasps and seals by a series of actions that might just make a person go crazy. The player needs to find keys, pick combinations, scout the locker for clues – and I’m not being sarcastic when I say that it’s damn easy to get lost around the cabinet. Screenshots don’t do justice to the crazy amount of elements each locker contains, and although there are hints, I got mildly frustrated several times, trying to solve the puzzles, or trying to find what the hell I was supposed to do next. It’s not that frustrating to complete, but it’s quite a challenge.

Another outstanding element in The Room is its design. Each piece of each safe is rich with engravings, details, and has great sound design. I literally cannot believe The Room 4this game is only worth a dollar, because it’s easily one of the best-looking and atmospheric games on the platform. The controls are quite awesome as well. Not only do they make use of the touch-screen, but they actually don’t make me want to strangle myself with an earplug cord! During the game, the player has to slide, rotate, turn, and switch an untold number of plugs and bits, and actually having to perform the actions, instead of just clicking on stuff, gives a great amount of satisfaction.

I’m not sure, but it’s entirely possible that The Room is number one Android quest there is. It’s worth ten times its price, and it even manages to cram a captivating story inside of its locked cabinets, in the form of notes and diaries. I don’t want to imply that it’s perfect from all sides – actually, screw that. The controls take a bit of getting used to, but besides that, The Room is a perfect Android quest.