4 Games to try out on the Honor 8 Pro

4 Games to try out on the Honor 8 Pro

Jun 2, 2017

The Honor 8 Pro packs a big punch when it comes to sheer performance. The phone’s 4,000 mAh battery, stunning display, and Kirin 960 processor make the phone a real dream for mobile gamers, too.

How do you make the most of those killer specs, though? These four games will show you what the Honor 8 Pro is truly capable of.

1. Perfect for clicking – SPACEPLAN

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The Honor 8 Pro boasts a beautiful 515ppi Quad HD display. The screen is big enough for serious gaming, but small enough to fit in your pocket. If you thought you needed a tablet to get the most out of your mobile games, think again. The Quad screen is super responsive, too, which is incredibly important for mobile gaming, especially when playing those idle clicker games.

Devolver Digital’s latest game, SPACEPLAN, is the perfect clicker game to take advantage of the Pro’s unique display. The game has beautiful graphics that will look great on the display, and it’s a clicker, meaning you’ll be tap, tap, tapping for a good long while.

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2. Stunning visuals – Monument Valley

If it’s gorgeous, cinematic visuals you seek, the Honor 8 Pro will not disappoint. The Quad HD display features advanced color management that will render your games with the highest fidelity. You can soak in every detail.

Monument Valley is the best game to put these features to the test. It’s easily one of the most beautiful games on the mobile market, with its bright colors and stunning environments.

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3. Lagging solutions – Brothers: A Tale of Two Sons

No one likes lag. In fact, the problem has spawned an obsession with framerates among gaming enthusiasts worldwide. That likely won’t be a problem with the Honor 8 Pro, with its lightning fast 8-core processor and Vulcan API, which specifically works to cut lag.

Test it for yourself with some of the most demanding Android games. Brothers: A Tale of Two Sons, a console and PC port launched last generation, is easily one of the most punishing games for mobile hardware. That shouldn’t be a problem for the Honor 8 Pro, though, thanks to its hefty processing power.

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4. Epic playing time – Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic

Battery life can be just as important as performance for mobile gamers, and the Honor 8 Pro performs in that area as well with 1.5 days* of battery life at full load. That gives you plenty of time for gaming before you have to charge.

Bioware’s Knights of the Old Republic is the perfect game to put that impressive battery to the test. Clocking in at 40 hours, this mobile port is a fantastic and faithful remake of one of the most famous western RPGs in recent years.

*Data based on Honor lab tests. Battery life may vary based on usage patterns and network conditions.

This article is sponsored as part of Steel Media Preferred Partners.

We tried the Honor 8 Pro for you: Here’s how it went

We tried the Honor 8 Pro for you: Here’s how it went

Jun 1, 2017

The Honor 8 Pro is the latest smartphone from Honor and marks an upgrade from the previously released Honor 8.

As Honor’s new flagship smartphone competing with the top high-end mobile devices on the market, a lot of work has gone into its sleek design, sharp camera lens and easy-to-use interface.

After a playtest with the phone, here’s what we found.

Unboxing

Upon unboxing the Honor 8 Pro you see just how far Honor has gone to make a product competing with the big players. Everything you need is neatly packed in, from the device itself to the charger and important documents.

What’s most unique however is the inclusion of a Google Cardboard headset. This means straight out of the box, after a tiny bit of set up, you can start experiencing virtual reality. This saves you having to go out and purchase a separate and expensive device, particularly useful if you’re unsure about VR in the first place.

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Design and Display

The Honor 8 Pro is a big phone – it has a 5.7 inch touch screen in fact. But it’s not unwieldy. It may take some getting used to at first if you’re used to smaller screens, but the 2560 x 1440 Quad HD display offers crisp images.

The screen’s size also offers more practical benefits, such as an easy to use touch keyboard and a bigger space for game user interfaces, which can make games more easily playable in some cases.

As for design, its flush 12-megapixel + 12-megapixel dual rear-facing camera, which doesn’t protrude outward, is a particular highlight that completes a real sleek look.

Battery life

The Honor 8 Pro packs in a 4,000 mAh battery that’s said to last for 2 full days of regular use and almost 1.44 days of intensive use.

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Having played a few games on the device, including the power sapping Pokemon GO, the phone holds up well to intensive usage. After about an hour of use, power did not suffer greatly, suggesting a few extended gameplay sessions won’t leave you without any power for the rest of the day.

In case you do start to run low on juice however, there are some smart options to keep your phone running. The typical power saving mode can add a few hours of battery life by limiting background app activity and reducing or disabling some visual effects and sounds.

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But the best feature here is the ‘Ultra’ power saving mode. During testing, selecting this mode offers a tremendous boost to battery life by cutting down the phone to only the most important apps. It automatically selects phone calls, texting and your contacts book – but leaves other slots to add apps of your choice.

User interface

The Honor 8 Pro uses Huawei’s EMUI 5.1 user interface. It’s simple and clean to use, and navigation buttons are built into the screen. The simple user interface makes it easy to navigate around your apps and rearrange your library to suit your tastes and needs. Settings are also easy to navigate, making it easy to customise features and set preferences.

This article is sponsored as part of Steel Media Preferred Partners

Mini Metro Review

Mini Metro Review

Apr 24, 2017

If I were to list some of the things that I find awful, trains would come near the top. They’re a mode of transport that doesn’t offer freedom and instead requires that you follow a rigid path through cramped tunnels and they only turn up when they want to. Imagine if your car refused to drive on anything other than the A13 and would only operate between the hours of 9am and 11pm. You wouldn’t stand for it, would you?

Anyway – my dislike for trains has been clearly noted and it’s only made it into this review to make the following statement even more impactful. Mini Metro is a game about operating trains and I think it’s outstanding. So there.

Some more detail, then. Mini Metro is something of an arcade puzzle game. The puzzle is that you’re looking at a map with train stations on it – much like the maps you’d see for London’s Underground service. These stations are all different shapes and soon you see they have passengers waiting at them. These passengers are also made of certain shapes which designates where they want to go. A small triangle waiting at the Square station simply means there’s someone who wants to go from the Square Station to the Triangle Station. Easy.unnamed-14

So you draw a line from one station to the next. The problem is that you have limited resources, such as tunnels, carriages and bridges. The arcade element comes with the pace of the game throwing new stations at you. The maps start off with 3 stations but very quickly you’re trying to figure out how to serve 20 stations of all varying shapes.

The trick is to try and figure out a sensible route for your trains to run, as customers will happily switch lines. What happens if you have too many people waiting at one stop though? What if 3 different lines all converge on one overcrowded station? It’s game over, that’s what.

The game will give you upgrades, such as faster trains, more carriages or more lines, but having these extra tools doesn’t always make your job easy. You still need to really think about just how to best serve your customers and just how overstretched one part of your train service is compared to other parts.

Each level does end in a ‘game over’ though, with the aim being to survive as long as you can. You need to transport as many passengers as possible and to reach a certain score to unlock the next level. However, even though each playthrough ends in a defeat of sorts, with you trying to best your previous score, it’s rare to feel angry at the game for causing your demise. 99% of the time you curse yourself for not changing the layout of your lines sooner, for not adding an extra carriage or for not noticing that a particular station was becoming too crowded.

There are the 1% of times, however, where you will feel slightly cheated by a sudden boom of popularity that simply couldn’t be predicted. These are few and far between though and what you have is a game that’s damn near perfect.

Mini Metro has sublime game design that has you cursing yourself, planning ahead and needing to react in the moment all at the same time. I hate trains. I love Mini Metro.


Real Baseball 3D Review

Real Baseball 3D Review

Mar 31, 2017

I know nothing about baseball. This still doesn’t stop me from realising that Real Baseball 3D is a bad baseball game. Someone who’s never seen a base nor a ball could tell you this.

The premise is simple. It’s baseball. When it comes to gameplay you’re only in charge of batting and pitching, with all of the fielding being taken care of for you. Occasionally you’ll be asked the question ‘do you want to steal a base’ or ‘do you want to throw to home or 1st base?’. Other than that, how successful your fielding is comes down to your player’s stats.

These stats are what the game’s all about. You collect cards which represent players. Each player will be rated on power, accuracy and the like. The game is set up in such a way that it obviously wants you to pay real money to get those better cards.unnamed-8

The problem is that pitching is boring and there’s little skill to it. You pick a type of throw, you aim and then you tap the screen when prompted to. Whether your AI opposition smacks the ball out the park or not is seemingly random.

Batting isn’t much better. All you need to do is tap the screen to swing your bat. Time it right and the ball sails away to get you a home run. Again, how the logic of this works out is unknown. Sometimes you’ll swear you timed your swing perfectly but, maybe, your AI pitcher has better stats than you so it means it goes straight into someone’s glove?

A massive problem with batting is that your swing occurs when you ‘release’ the screen. This means that your ‘tap’ feels delayed as it only starts animating once you lift your finger. Why on Earth it’s programmed this way, I have no idea.

Then there’s the adverts. There’s loads of them and they pop up right in the middle of a game. Seemingly random, some downs will end in an advert filling the screen whilst others won’t. Then there’s the messy menus to fight through all in the name of getting better stats so you can do ‘better’ in what is a really dull pitching and batting game.

There aren’t that many modes to enjoy either. You’ll spend most of your time improving your franchise but when it all boils down to playing a bad game of baseball, you’ll feel no desire to improve your team.

One last thing that sticks out like a sore thumb is the un-licensed nature of the game. It’s fine that you don’t have the MLB license, but have your game load with a poorly Photoshopped picture of the New York ‘Gibnts’. ‘Gibnts’ isn’t even a word and it makes no sense.

Akihabara – Feel the Rhythm Review

Akihabara – Feel the Rhythm Review

Mar 27, 2017

I feel sorry for game designers sometimes. It can feel like every ‘type’ of game has been made already – just how do you come up with something people have never seen before? One easy way to do this is to simply combine already popular ideas together.

So this is Akihabara – Feel the Rhythm – it’s combination of Tetris, Connect 4 and a rhythm game. This means that blocks fall from the top of the screen and land at the bottom. The blocks are different colours, so you naturally need to have 4 of the same type touching each other to ‘clear’ them and get points. The rhythm-wrinkle comes from you being able to alter the colour of falling blocks by tapping the screen at the right moment.

This is because as with all good rhythm games you have a line travelling from left to right and it’s moving in time to the beat. Each beat of the song you’re hearing is timed so that the line transitions from one block to the next. To get a high score and a multiplier built up, you need to time your colour-swapping screen taps in time to the music.unnamed-11

It’s a nice idea and one that had me interested to play Akihabara – Feel the Rhythm in the first place. Sadly the rhythm aspect of the game doesn’t really matter, so it kind of falls flat as a rhythm game. You’ll never ‘fail’ a level because you’re tapping out of time.

Then it’s sad to say that the Tetris / Connect 4 elements doesn’t work too well either as there’s no sense of danger when blocks are falling. This is because all blocks are the same shape, they’re just squares. Also, each time you tap the screen you can see what colour you’ll be swapping a descending block for. There’s no randomness to the blocks falling or to the order of which new colour is being inserted into the falling block.

It means the game’s not a challenge in terms of puzzling and it doesn’t really care if you can keep a beat either. So you’re left with falling blocks that you can easily change the colour of and all you need to do is group 4 of them together.

It’s a shame because the idea’s a good one, the music’s nice and the controls work well for what they are. It’s just that there’s no excitement to playing the game and when all you’ve got is a ‘campaign’ which is more of a battle of endurance than skill, it kind of stops being fun.

Akihabara – Feel the Rhythm sits in a bizarre no-man’s land of genres. It’s a solid idea that’s lacking in its execution and won’t grab you like a good puzzle game needs to and it won’t challenge you like a good rhythm game needs to.


Endless Frontier is an action-packed incremental game for the mobile

Endless Frontier is an action-packed incremental game for the mobile

Feb 23, 2017

Idle doesn’t have to mean lazy. Case-in-point – Ekkorr’s Endless Frontier. Released in 2016, it takes incremental gaming back to its RPG roots, with a fantasy setting and an action-packed battle between good and evil.

One millennium ago, a hero called Erin has vowed to defeat the Prince of Darkness and his hordes. But Erin’s too weak, and is beaten. Thankfully this is a fantasy world, where respawning is as normal as blowing your nose – so Erin comes back from the dead, returns to the frontline and tries again.

You’re responsible for a band of fighters fulfilling Erin’s quest, making their way passed waves of enemies’ one stage at a time. This being an idle game, you don’t actually have to get involved in the on-screen dust-up. Instead, your job is to manage the resources as they pour in, spending them on upgrades and unlocking new units in order to progress beyond the more difficult stages.

There are 1,500 stages in total, so don’t expect to speed run your way to glory. The reward in Endless Frontier comes from getting that little bit further each time you work your way up from stage one.

Drawing heavily from the world of MMORPGs, you can join and create guilds, playing co-operatively or competing with rival guilds. There’s a solo PvP arena mode as well, if you fancy taking on some of your fellow players. Not many idle games include that level of extra gameplay.

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If Endless Frontier sounds like your kind of idle game, you can download it from Google Play and the App Store.

This article is sponsored as part of Steel Media Preferred Partner’s.

Fire Emblem Heroes Review

Fire Emblem Heroes Review

Feb 20, 2017

Nintendo are under some serious scrutiny with their foray into the mobile game scene. Most other publishers can fart out a Flappy Bird clone and no one would think twice but this is Nintendo. Ninty. The House of Mario. Big N. They have standards and a reputation to keep (and a new console to launch) so it’s important that they do things right.

Miitomo aside and ignoring Pokemon GO (which they didn’t make), Fire Emblem Heroes is Nintendo’s first ‘proper’ game to launch on Android (Super Mario Run, where are you?). I’m pleased to say that it’s a success in many, many regards yet it also shows a naivety towards the mobile gaming scene in how it handles IAPs.

Before I get too ahead of myself, let’s explain what Fire Emblem Heroes is. Well, it’s a turn-based strategy game based on the hugely popular Fire Emblem series. Never heard of Fire Emblem? Well, that’s on you – because it is hugely popular. Honest.

The scenario is pure fantasy, dragons and magic fare. Fire Emblem games often boil down to wizards and kings becoming evil or fighting evil or wanting to be rulers of evil. So the story’s not important in the Fire Emblem world, what is important is the mechanic of how you build up an array of characters to go into battle with.

You see, the Fire Emblem games are filled with hundreds of unique characters and the thing that makes Fire Emblem stand out is that these characters can die. Die, die. As in the ‘this character got killed and we know you spent 20 hours leveling her up but she’s dead’ kind of die.

Pretty savage.

Now, Fire Emblem Heroes does away with the ‘proper dead’ mechanic but it is full of the titular heroes and more heroes are being added through updates. Not only has the Fire Emblem’s death mechanic been softened but so has everything else. Console Fire Emblem games can have sprawling battle maps and have you take a large number of units into battle.unnamed-2

Fire Emblem Heroes strips all of this back and has you take only 4 characters into the fight, with the battlefield being a single screen map. This works really well though, as it means that battles are over within a couple of minutes. The combat also has a fairly simple ‘rock-paper-scissors’ strength and weakness system involving spears, swords and axes. It’s straightforward but it’s fast-paced and really enjoyable.

What’s a bit of a let down is the IAPs and the rest of the systems that exist outside of battles. The issue is that there’s shard, crystals, feathers, orbs, dueling swords and a stamina bar to keep track of. It’s more convoluted than it needs to be and it makes levelling up your character more of a pain than it needs to be.

The IAPs need to be called out in particular as they are such a miss it’s unbelievable. Essentially, the only thing you can buy in this game is ‘orbs’. These orbs are used to summon new heroes and they’re the key to getting your favourite characters from previous Fire Emblem games into your party. It takes 5 orbs to summon a character and it costs £1.99 for 3 orbs. 3 orbs are practically worthless. They can’t be used for anything good, so it means that, at a minimum, you’re going to spend £4 just to get a new character, at random.

When you take into consideration the chances of getting a good character (4 stars or better) are 43%. This is an absolutely shocking value proposition, so it’s handy that the game dishes out tons of orbs for completing missions. Which then leaves you wondering just how Nintendo plan on making money off this thing? Who’s buying these orbs?

Obviously someone is – with reports that the game’s already made over $5 million since launch. Still, that’s a topic for another time. This is a review and I’ve got to say I’m impressed with the game. It’s bitesize fighting with just enough tactical challenge.


Tap Titans 2 Review

Tap Titans 2 Review

Jan 30, 2017

Another clicker game? Why do I do this to myself? Good clicker games will simply hook into the part of the brain that creates habits and will keep you playing even if you don’t want to. Bad clicker games are beyond dull and offer no gameplay whatsoever. There’s no way to win when clicker games are involved.

Except – this time it’s different. Honest. This time I’m playing Tap Titans 2 and this time the game is really… good? Who am I kidding? Tap Titans 2 is good in the same way that a Big Mac* is good. You know it’s bad for you but damn it’s tasty.

What makes Tap Titans 2 so tasty? Well, for a start, it’s absolutely loaded with carrots. They’re dangling everywhere you look and there’s just so much to unlock. There’s a daily login bonus, there’s tons of ‘allies’ to unlock, upgrade and each of them has skills to unlock, there’s items to find and equip, there’s artifacts to unlock, there’s skills to learn there’s…unnamed-31

There’s a lot going on and it would be easy for Tap Titans 2 to fail in expressing what everything does. It doesn’t fail and in fact one of the strengths of Tap Titans 2 is the fact that it’s so easy to see what’s happening with each tap and with each unlock. Some unlocks make your taps stronger, some will make monsters drop more gold, some will boost your allies’ strength and it’s simple to figure out. Bottom line is that whilst you have the app open and you’re tapping away, you’re never more than a couple of seconds away from being able to unlock, upgrade or equip something new.

The gameplay itself is nothing special. It is, after all, a clicker game. All of these unlocks and abilities do nothing more than make small numbers turn into bigger numbers. You start off earning 100 gold for each kill but soon earn 100 million. You begin doing 1 damage per tap and quickly start doing 1 trillion.

But it’s all done so well. The graphics are sharp and characters are well animated. There’s tons of content, with lots of different enemy types and locations to work through and at the heart of it all there’s just an unforgiving number of ‘hooks’. Hooks that keep you playing, hooks that convince you to open up the app every day and hooks that make you want to get to the next level. I’ve not even mentioned the fact you can join clans.

Tap Titans 2 isn’t a great game but it is an outstanding clicker. It will reward you for doing nothing more than tapping mindlessly at your phone. But boy do those rewards feel good.

*This only makes sense if you enjoy a Big Mac from time to time. Insert your own junk food / guilty pleasure here


Overtake Review

Overtake Review

Jan 30, 2017

I’m all for simplicity. I’m always impressed when a game can be fun and engaging when all it asks you to do it tap on the screen, learn one or two rules and doesn’t require you to play an hour long tutorial.

In this regard, I suppose, Overtake : Car Traffic Racing is something of a success. It’s blindingly simple. You are a car, you go forward and you try not to crash into other cars. Simple.

This is about as far as I can when trying to praise this game. The simplicity on offer is then let down by pretty much everything else. Firstly, the controls. At the start of each run you get to choose if you want to tile your phone to steer or if you want on-screen buttons. Whilst playing the game I found neither particularly responsive enough to avoid the oncoming traffic, which led to collisions.

Collisions are awful. Instead of looking like tons of metal colliding into one another it instead resembles two dry sponges bouncing off each other. Often a collision won’t be enough to end your run, as the run only finished when your car’s health gauge reaches zero. This means that the collision has now pointed you in the wrong direction, leaving you to right yourself using the previously mentioned awful turning mechanics.

Maybe I’m just not good at the game? Maybe I need to unlock a better car? Maybe you’re right. What isn’t right is the way the game locks everything behind paywalls or asks you to grind for hours to unlock anything. New cars and new tracks will take an absolute age to work towards and their IAP prices are pretty tough to swallow.

Add to the mix the fact you have randomly appearing adverts. After some runs, an advert will fill the screen. After some returns to the main menu and advert will fill the screen. You get no rewards for these adverts and they’re intrusive.

And that’s pretty much all there is to the game. There’s 3 ‘modes’, but they just alter the direction of the traffic you’re driving past. The game is nothing more than a series of dodging challenges but with some bad steering controls. There’s different tracks to race on but they don’t change the game in any meaningful way.

Overtake is boring, controls badly and offers no variation to its poor gameplay. It looks quite nice, I suppose, with some well modeled 3D cars. That’s about the nicest thing I can say about Overtake. It has some nice car models. Avoid it.


The Stunning Art of The Witness on NVIDIA SHIELD TV

The Stunning Art of The Witness on NVIDIA SHIELD TV

Jan 26, 2017



Much has been made of the puzzles featured within The Witness, the recent release from Jonathan Blow (developer of Braid), and they deserve any admiration they receive. The game is more than just a series of mind benders, however. It also offers the chance to tour a beautiful island paradise, one that comes to breathtaking life on the new NVIDIA SHIELD TV.

Rather than go the hyper-realistic route, the developers at Thekla Inc. adopted the cel-shaded style memorably used in a number of other games. In The Witness, that simple but effective art style is used to perhaps its greatest effect yet, turning the varied island environments into a true wonder to behold.

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As you explore the island, you’ll encounter a variety of trees. Some are naked, black skeletons that rise toward the sky while the desert sand stretches around them like a blanket. Others are covered in foliage: greens and oranges, even pink. Their hues bring to mind the cycle of the seasons, and they contrast beautifully with the surrounding foliage and architecture.

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Water is also rendered beautifully, whether that be the placid shoreline as it plays over the shallow sea bed, or the foamy caps of waves colliding with boulders. There also are cascading waterfalls, and turbulent rapids. Water greets you at every turn, constantly in motion, not the lifeless backdrop to which gamers have often become accustomed.

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The island’s attractions, though a pleasure to view up close, often look even better when glimpsed from afar. As you climb the cliffs near the center of the region, you can see roots embedded in the clay wall, protruding the patches of soil that rest between large boulders. Continue along the trail and, at several points, you’ll find yourself looking out over a sea of trees, to distant towers and the endless ocean beyond.

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Such views have rarely been so beautiful within the medium, and the knowledge that you can walk virtually anywhere you see adds another layer to the experience. It’s a seamless experience that makes every boulder, fern, and stretch of rocky trail feel more genuine.

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The Witness is available now on NVIDIA SHIELD TV for $19.99 (half the price of the PC edition). As you solve the island’s puzzles, enjoy beautiful sights such as those pictured above and find favorite places of your own. There are plenty to go around…

This article is sponsored as part of Steel Media Preferred Partner’s.

Arcane Online gives MMO fans a new character class to get to grips with

Arcane Online gives MMO fans a new character class to get to grips with

Jan 23, 2017

If you’re looking for a new MMO to get your year off to a good start, Arcane Online will probably do the trick. Gameplay follows the popular fantasy format – slay monsters, join guilds, win loot and level up. Rinse and repeat until you’re the biggest, baddest hero in all of Tristram. Or in this case, the troubled land of Eldine.

With this latest update, Arcane Online has gained a new character class. Alongside the mage, the shaman and the warrior, you can now fight as the archer. A master of the long range, you can hang back and hammer your foes with arrows. Each class has its own skill set, so pick your character based on your preferred play style.

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There’s also a new guild vs. guild event called Dominion Wars. During the battle, up to twenty players on each side attempt to win control of territories, with minions, bosses and towers standing in the way of glory.

To make glory a little easier to nab, the update introduces a buddy system. Essentially, this mean you can summon your own battlefield ‘pet’ to aid you in combat with a range of passive and active skills. There are 28 possible buddies for you to collect and raise, including animals like raccoons, dogs and ducks, as well as magical beings and animate objects like mimics. You can even give them each a name!

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So if your new year’s resolution is to slay more monsters than ever before, you might want to start by downloading Arcane Online from Google Play or the App Store.

This article is sponsored as part of Steel Media Preferred Partner’s.

Burrito Bison – Luancha Libre Review

Burrito Bison – Luancha Libre Review

Jan 17, 2017

Some games are about skill, some will challenge your mental capabilities and others have a story to tell. There are also some games that are just exercises in repetition that require little thought and minimal technique. These games can be awesome and Burrito Bison – Launcha Libre is evidence of that.

The set-up is as follows – you’re a lucha libre trapped in a candy kingdom. The only way to escape is to launch yourself from the ropes and fly through the air to freedom. How this plays out is really simple. Drag your wrestler back and launch them, much like Angry Birds, and once you’re airborne you have nothing to do but tap the screen to perform a special ability.

With a choice of three wrestlers, you special ability will differ depending on who you’re playing as. One will slam into the ground at great force, one will launch a grappling hook to pull themselves onto an enemy and another can glide upward before falling back down.

So where’s the game? Well, this being an evil candy kingdom there’s gummy bears everywhere and you need to try and land on them to earn cash. There are different types of gummy bears, some that will slow you down and others that will launch you into the air, speed you up or give you a ball of honey that devours all the bears in your wake.

It’s really basic but it’s compelling because there’s a good variety of sugary enemies to bump into, each with their own unique affect on your character, and there’s loads of upgrades to unlock. You’ll need these upgrades if you want to get your wrestler to the end of each area. Getting to the end of each area is a feat but it’s blasting through the walls will let you move onto the next area of the candy kingdom. So all you need to do is make sure you keep your speed up, keep on upgrading and before you know it each run you make will consist of you breaching multiple cookie walls and destroying tons of gummy bears. Simple.

As you may be aware of, Burrito Bison – Launcha Libre is incredibly simple but it’s incredibly slick and well presented that it’s a real joy to play. Each of the enemies are well designed and fun to crash into, the 3 different wrestlers play only slightly differently but these slight differences make big differences to how you play and the audio gives every collision a real sense of power.

In the end, Burrito Bison – Launcha Libre is a very simple game but it’s made so well, has a lot of variety based around its simple premise and is incredibly generous with its advertising and IAPs. I can’t recommend Burrito Bison – Launcha Libre enough. It’s simple but it’s polished and it’s free but it doesn’t demand you watch a ton of adverts. Great stuff.