Chrome Browser for Android Expands Chromecast Support and Adds Other Nifty Tweaks and Features

Chrome Browser for Android Expands Chromecast Support and Adds Other Nifty Tweaks and Features

May 21, 2014

The latest Chrome for Android update has added a few welcome new features to make Google’s browser of choice even better. There’s the ability to undo the closing of tabs. Video finally supports fullscreen “immersive mode” where the Android navigation bars go away, using up the entirety of the device’s screen. As well, some videos can be casted to a Chromecast. Along with other bug fixes, there’s added support for multi-window devices. The update is available now on Google Play.

Opera Update Brings In-Browser Video Calls

Opera Update Brings In-Browser Video Calls

Mar 12, 2014

Opera 2

Setting up a live video conference doesn’t require a specialized app anymore, if you have Opera Browser in your Android phone. The latest update brings an option to set up a conversation with up to eight people through WebRTC. The new update also gives some design improvements. Get it here: Opera Mobile on Google Play.

New Google Chrome Update Expected To Cut Data Usage By 50%

New Google Chrome Update Expected To Cut Data Usage By 50%

Jan 23, 2014

Chrom Update 2

The upcoming update to Google Chrome promises some significant improvements – especially for its mobile version. Namely, it says that it’ll cut browsing data usage by 50%. The update introduce a special mode in the preferences that, when activate, will save the user’s traffic consumption. It also shows chart for the amount of traffic saved. You can find more information here: Google Chrome Blog. The update will ship any day now.

Free App Recap November 20th – Android Browsers

Free App Recap November 20th – Android Browsers

Nov 20, 2012

Much like on a computer, a web browser comes preinstalled on Android devices, and Google Chrome is available as well. The good news is, this is not the only web browser available for Android. In fact, there are A lot of different Android web browsers to choose from. The browsers listed below are just a few of the possibilities. Usually when installing a new web browser, it’s done for specific reasons. One such reason to install one of the browsers below is because it will let video be played on many devices that don’t have the ability to play video natively.


Ninesky Browser


Ninesky Browser is a great browser for people more concerned with their online privacy. With all of the sites out there trying to get as much information about browsing habits as possible, keeping personal privacy can be difficult these days. When browsing with Ninesky Browser, a warning pops up notifying of any site trying to phish for information.

Download Ninesky Browser


UC Browser for Android


UC Browser for Android has a lot of really cool features made specifically for browsing on mobile devices. Some of the cool features are:

  • Night Mode to browse better at night.
  • Vox gives voice control over the features of the browser.
  • A built-in RSS Reader
  • Download Manager

On a mobile device, speed is essential. If it takes too long to download a page, most people lose interest and go back to what they were doing. Having a really fast browser pages can be viewed a lot quicker.

Download UC Browser for Android


Skyfire Web Browser 4.0


Skyfire is a great browser for anyone who has a device that doesn’t support video. The reason Skyfire can play videos while other browsers can’t, is because Skyfire doesn’t rely on any other application or resource on Android phone. While this isn’t 100% guaranteed, it’s still a great option for Android devices with slower processors or don’t have the option of flash.

Download Skyfire Web Browser 4.0

Skyfire Wants to Bring Extensions to Mobile Browsers with Skyfire Horizon

Skyfire Wants to Bring Extensions to Mobile Browsers with Skyfire Horizon

Oct 11, 2012

Skyfire, most known for their browser that supports Flash video for iOS and Android, is launching Skyfire Horizon, a set of tools that are trying to bring extensions to mobile browsers. Extensions are a major part of the desktop browsing experience, but have not really appeared in a significant way on a mainstream browser (Firefox Mobile supports extensions, but that’s about it). However, with a swipe from the bottom of the screen, Skyfire Horizon will be able to call up extensions, such as being able to easily tweet about a page, find apps related to the webpage, or even find special offers relating to that page. Of course, the possibility for extensions is very wide, and there exists opportunities for developers who can take advantage of it as well.

Now, don’t expect to see Skyfire Horizon available under that name, as they’re planning on making it available to carriers to brand with their own services. If the major US carriers all adopt it, then it could prove to be something ubiquitious on Android without being a Google-deployed option, which could be a particularly juicy scenario.

Opera Mobile 12.1 Releases, But WebKit Support is Not Here Yet

Opera Mobile 12.1 Releases, But WebKit Support is Not Here Yet

Oct 9, 2012

Opera has released version 12.1 of the Opera Mobile browser for Android. While they’ve been known for the data-saving Opera Mini, this is a full-fledged version of the Opera browser that renders pages on the device itself, though the remote-rendering “turbo” mode is available here. One of the big new features is under the hood, as the SPDY technology for faster page rendering is now supported by the browser. Websites including Twitter and Gmail use this SPDY protocol. Other new features include WebSockets support, and improved CSS and HTML5 compatibility for better user experience.

Note that this is not the version of Opera that will supports the -webkit CSS prefix. For those not in the know, this is a controversial decision as it is furthering the practice of browsers just essentially pronouncing themselves as a WebKit browser, with WebKit being the underlying technology behind Chrome and Safari browsers, for example. Opera doesn’t necessarily use WebKit, but has support for its prefix, which could bring up errors for sites that are optimized for Opera but may not have their WebKit optimizations work properly in Opera. Still, the browser may need this to stay competitive as a real alternative choice.

Open Video Codecs on Mobile Are All But Dead Thanks to Mozilla.

Open Video Codecs on Mobile Are All But Dead Thanks to Mozilla.

Mar 23, 2012

Mozilla made an announcement recently that doesn’t seem like a big deal, but is important. They’ve added native H.264 video codec support to Firefox Mobile, adopting the closed format, in addition to supporting open codecs like WebM and Theora. H.264 is the codec that the industry has largely adopted as the widespread video codec of choice – it’s everywhere from Blu-rays to iTunes to being used to distribute pirated TV shows. It’s the one thing pirates and the copyright industry can really agree on, that H.264 is a swell video codec.

Now, mobile Firefox will natively play back these videos in HTML5 with the

Mozilla says that they had to make this decision to sacrifice some of their principles for an improved user experience. Not supporting H.264 video is a killer lack of a feature to have in a mobile browser. This is because after years of numerous competing standards, H.264 is the closest thing to a unified video standard in the industry right now, and so much video supports that format. File containers are still a mess, especially as everyone likes their own container, and the MKV container, despite its usefulness, is something legitimate contest industries won’t touch because of its association with piracy. WebM and Theora just had no hope on mobile. And as Mozilla points out in their blog, Google hasn’t been cashing the checks their mouth has been writing as they still push H.264 video in many forms.

The idea is ultimately that codecs shouldn’t matter, that video should just play anywhere. Would it be better if the leading codec was free as in freedom? Yes. But isn’t it more important that our videos play in some format, period?

Chrome for Android Beta Now Available for Ice Cream Sandwich Devices

Chrome for Android Beta Now Available for Ice Cream Sandwich Devices

Feb 7, 2012

Google Chrome is finally on Android.. A beta version of Chrome for Android has launched for Ice Cream Sandwich devices on the Android Market. This is an official version of Chrome, Google’s WebKit-based desktop browser that has yet to be integrated as part of their Android browser. This may be the first step in that direction.

Experience–wise, it is impressively similar to the desktop version. Fonts and websites render similarly, and performance is generally snappy. However, vertical scrolling appears to be the app’s general weakness at this point – it’s rather choppy, and something that likely is part of the ‘beta’ distinction.

The browser supports both phones and tablets on ICS. Tablets get an interface more akin to the desktop experience, with the familiar tab bar at top.Private browsing is also available, with the ability to switch between the regular set of tabs and Chrome‘s “Incognito” tabs with a tap of the icon in the upper right corner of the screen. Cross-device synchronization is a big strength of Chrome for Android, as it can not only synchronize bookmarks across devices, but also look up URLs from the same history as the desktop version, access tabs that were pulled up in the desktop version of Chrome. It appears as if this synchronization is one way only at this point, and there’s no way for desktop Chrome to pull up that same info from mobile devices. There’s also no way to change the user agent or to request a desktop site, something the official broswer has. This is an issue particularly on Android tablets, because there is no browser user agent distinction between Android phones and tablets, so tablets often are served the version of the site for phones.

The problem right now with Chrome for Android is that it’s only available for Ice Cream Sandwich users. With the total nuumber of Android devices running ICS apparently at 1% (something that headline makers have noticed and picked up on, with the 99%/1% distinction being part of the Occupy movement), this means that Chrome for Android won’t be the primary browsing experience any time soon. But, as new Android devices launch with ICS, and as current devices begin to see ICS, the time for Chrome to take over may be soon, as the project continues advancing. Chrome for Android Beta is available now from the Android Market.

Mozilla Launches Firefox 4 for Android

Mozilla Launches Firefox 4 for Android

Mar 30, 2011

If you’ve been feeling like there’s a lack of browser options for Android, well, the party just increased by one. Finally out of Beta and ready to rock, Firefox 4 is available now on the Android Market.

Fast, easy to use and customizable, Mozilla’s browser is packed with features. You can sync your history, bookmarks, tabs, settings and passwords across all of your devices for a unified browsing experience. Plus, Firefox 4 runs on the same platform as the desktop version, so you can be sure you’re getting all of the speed and power of its bigger brother.

Dolphin Browsers Making a Splash in the Android Market

Dolphin Browsers Making a Splash in the Android Market

Dec 23, 2010

Dolphin Browsers are one of the most powerful and popular 3rd party browsers available for Android. Dolphin Browsers have a lot of “firsts” when it comes to browsers for Android. They were the first to support multi-touch pinch zoom, the first to feature gesture commands, and the first mobile browser to offer support for add-ons. They work hard to give users as many features as possible without sacrificing speed or integrity. Some exciting announcements have come out of the Dolphin Browser camp this past week, offering Android users even more choices when it comes to browser experience. The first announcement out of the gate was the addition of the Dolphin Browser Mini (Beta) to the Android Market.

Opera Mobile 10.1 Beta Available

Opera Mobile 10.1 Beta Available

Nov 15, 2010

Opera promised us a browser on November 9th and sure enough, it’s now in the Android Market. I feel so lucky as an Android user to have as many options as we do. This is not the same thing as Opera Mini for those wondering and there are some differences which may or may not suit your needs. So what exactly is Opera Mobile boasting and why should we give their browser a try? Let’s take a look at what they are highlighting as features:

Firefox 4 Beta Part 2

Firefox 4 Beta Part 2

Nov 12, 2010

It’s been less than a month and already Firefox 4 Beta has been bumped to level 2. This newer beta has slimmed down to 17MB and loads pages 40% faster than Beta 1. Firefox 4 Beta’s greatest strength comes in its ability to synchronize your Firefox history, bookmarks, open tabs, passwords and form data between your desktop and mobile (I’m hoping Gingerbread will bring us synchronization with chrome). On the flip side, lack of Flash support seems to be one of Firefox 4 Beta’s biggest pitfalls.