Beetle Breaker, a New Explosive Puzzler Published by Chillingo

Beetle Breaker, a New Explosive Puzzler Published by Chillingo

Feb 24, 2014

Beetle Breaker 4

Beetle Breaker gives the player a certain number of suicidal explosive bugs that are then launched via slingshot. The task is to destroy the objects, different one each level, evading the traps and other difficulties in the level. The game can be downloaded for free from here: Beetle Breaker on Google Play.

Ant Raid Review

Ant Raid Review

Feb 13, 2013

I wasnt really sure what to expect when I downloaded Ant Raid. I thought it might be another bug smasher game. There is a little of that in there, but there is also some other strategies needed to beat the levels. The overall plot of the game is to keep the ant’s home save from the other insects. The insects have been infected and are pretty much zombies. Okay, that right there grabbed my attention.

The controls are pretty easy to use. Most of the controls are tapping the screen in one spot then another. Some times a press and drag is required to gather a larger group of ants. When the divine power is all powered up, tapping the enemy bugs will shoot lightening at them or other times a tap on them will squish them. Pressing and dragging a finger on the screen will help look around and see some of the enemies coming farther away.

As the ants are fighting the evils snails and bees, the good ants will get hurt. When this happens, healthy ants need to be sent to out to get them and bring them back to the base camp to be healed. The strategy comes into play when there are a lot of enemies on the screen. There are only so many good ants to fight.

I thought the game was pretty easy, then all of a sudden they drop the hammer and it gets pretty challenging. They have all kinds of enemies coming out of the woods and attacking. The goal is to kill enough of them to be able to use the divine powers. If this doesn’t happen they will overrun the base. The enemies don’t really move all that fast but some of the bees will move around making it more difficult for the ants to attack them.

Fruit Roll Review

Fruit Roll Review

Nov 30, 2011

I love a game that has instructions in the title. Fruit Roll is a game wherein you are a piece of fruit, rolling along. As you go you collect stars and roll over opponents. It’s fantastically straight-forward – you don’t even control the speed or direction of the rolling. It’s very charming in its simplicity, and another favourite for playing on the bus.

Fruit Roll has no plot, but it really doesn’t need one. As mentioned, you play as a piece of fruit, and each stage begins with you rolling across the screen. You cannot stop rolling, but you are able to jump. Jumping allows you to target and collect stars along the path. There are various other (non-sentient) fruit along the path and collecting them has benefits. There are different obstacles/enemies along the way, and the type of fruit you are determines whether or not rolling into them will knock them off the screen or cause you to come to a teary-eyed halt. Collecting three fruit of the same kind is a combo and not only will you change into that fruit, but a giant, rampaging version of that fruit. You’ll destroy everything in your path and have a much better shot at grabbing stars since you’re four times your regular size. The combo will run out however and you will return to your original fruit size. Each level becomes more difficult as the incline down which you’re rolling increases and so you roll much faster and with less control over your movements – one wrong jump could send you flying into the hands of an angry monkey and end your turn abruptly.

I really like this game for its lack of story. The fruit does have and needs no motivation to run over the caterpillars and red frogs in its path. Snagging the stars as you fly across the screen is rather addictive, like the coins in Mario, and is motivation enough.

Running into an opponent that you are not classed to knock off screen causes you to “die” and you are back to the first stage with none of your stars to show for it. This is the game’s real weak spot, as the only gameplay mode you begin with is Adventure (continuous play). There is apparently a mini-game mode, but it can only be reached by collecting 10,000 stars. This would happen soon enough if dying didn’t completely erase your store of stars each time. At a certain point this can become frustrating enough that it dampens the enthusiasm needed to keep rolling along. The game is fun, but needs more reasons to keep coming back.

Doodle Grub – Twisted Snake Review

Doodle Grub – Twisted Snake Review

Jun 29, 2011

It’s fair to say that if some Swedish mega-genius hadn’t decided to include Snake on Nokia’s early mobile phones, we might not be in the position that we are today. That simple act turned mobile phones into more than just phones that were mobile, and paved the way for the jack-of-all-trades multimedia devices we carry around with us today.

It seems fitting then that things have come round almost full circle. Doodle Grub is an attempt to recapture the glory days of 2D mobile phone gaming, with a bit of up-to-date polish and some rather more modern ideas about control than Nokia were able to implement in their clone of a clone. The question is, is this nostalgia gone mad or a welcome blast from the past?

First things first, Doodle Grub’s main difference from the original Snake, other than the way it looks, is the way it handles. You’re not pushing buttons or sliding your thumb around on an imaginary D-pad; instead you’re moving your snake, or grub, around using the accelerometer in your phone. In other words, to make the snake go left, you tilt your phone left.

It’s a system that almost works, but it’s not quite subtle enough to deal with the quick changes in speed and direction that the game calls for. Whilst you no longer have to dodge your own tail, there are plenty of other obstacles getting between you and the tasty apples you crave, including giant bugs, and the tilt controls just aren’t good enough when you need them most. It’s a shame, because the game’s other ideas all work really well. Some of the fruit you go after is rotten, and will lose you points if you eat it, and ladybugs act as Pacman style power pills, turning you into a spiky, bug killing machine.

Doodle Bug is a nice try to do something new with an old favourite. Sadly, it doesn’t quite pull it off, but it’s still worth a look if you fancy reliving the good old days when phone games were simple and sating the hunger of a four pixel wide snake was the only thing that mattered.

Bug Village Review

Bug Village Review

Jun 21, 2011

There’s a trend at the moment for cutesy god games, simulators where you take control of a cartoon farm, city or shop and try and make it successful. To do this you manage resources, keep away dangers and make sure that everyone in your little conurbation is as happy as can be.

Bug Village is a new entry into the genre from Glu Mobile, originally released on iOS, which tasks you with the building and upkeep of a village for ants and bees. Because as everyone knows, bees and ants are the best of friends and like to live as close to each other as possible. You also have to right fallen ladybugs, but they’re not allowed to live in the village, because that would be weird.

After a brief tutorial, you’re left to manage the village on your own, building new houses for your ever increasing population, leaving them resources and food to find and making sure that none of those evil stink bugs stay too long around your precious huts and fences.

Whilst the game is free to download, you’re only given a certain number of coins to start off with. You don’t need the coins to play the game, but they speed things up a good deal, turning tasks that will, quite literally, take hours, into tasks that take a matter of seconds. If you want more coins, you have to pay, via an in-app purchase system.

The control system is simple, you use your finger as the cursor, tapping on things you want to do. The game looks and sounds almost exactly like you’d expect it to look and sound, all cute insects and twee songs with the odd tinkle and tone thrown in for good measure.

Bug Village is a perfectly passable little sim. It’s not particularly groundbreaking, and the in-app payment scheme will likely put some people off, but if you’re looking for an easy, time consuming game that’s not going to tax your brain or your reflexes, then it could be just what you’re looking for.