CES 2013: Dell Wyse Announces Project Ophelia, an Android Dongle Designed for Enterprise and Cloud Services

CES 2013: Dell Wyse Announces Project Ophelia, an Android Dongle Designed for Enterprise and Cloud Services

Jan 8, 2013

Dell Wyse has a new small form factor piece of Android-powered technology that hopes to turn any display into a way to manage cloud-based content. Codenamed Project Ophelia, this small dongle, resembling a USB stick but instead having an HDMI MHL output, allows users to connect to a wifi network and connect Bluetooth accessories to turn a monitor or TV into a productive device.

Now, this kind of device is nothing new – various Chinese manufacturers have made similar devices, but this one promises to differentiate itself by integrating in Dell Wyse’s cloud services. It has integrated enterprise security for secure access from various users. It can interface with remote desktop software from Citrix, Microsoft and VMware. It’s compatible with many Dell Wyse thin clients. It’s built on an unspecified Android 4.x version, so it will be compatible with many recent Android features.

Software support is often the concern with many of these Android-on-a-dongle devices, particularly their unofficial nature that may have limited access to services like Google Play. However, with a clear goal for this device, this could be interesting for business users or anyone just looking for a useful, portable Android device to use on a large display. Project Ophelia should be available in the first half of 2013.

CloudMagic Review

CloudMagic Review

Feb 22, 2012

What CloudMagic aspires to do is to help bring together the various cloud services that we use. The app, which recently just released, allows users to link a Google account (with support for Google Apps accounts) and a Twitter account, in order to index emails, contacts, calendars, and more, to make them universally searchable from one interface. So, typing in a certain search term will show relevant emails, calendar events, contacts, and recent tweets matching that search entry.

For example, I linked together multiple Google accounts and my Twitter account, then I did a search for “GDC” and the results were as expected. It showed all the results for GDC in my email inboxes. It searched my calendars for my GDC events. Most impressively, it did a search through only my Twitter contacts that I follow for tweets about GDC. I cannot stress how important and useful that last sentence is. Twitter search is such a mess, and having something that turns up relevant results from the people that I follow is worth keeping this tool around alone, never mind the Google integration.

In fact, the key drawback to CloudMagic at this time is the fact that it only integrates in Google and Twitter. For someone who uses both, this is fantastic, but for other email/contacts/calendar service users, it’s somewhat lacking. Facebook and Google+ would be useful services to integrate, as the commentary from people on those services could be useful in finding relevant social data. Twitter searching can only go back so far, likely due to Twitter limits, although it can easily find self-posted tweets and direct messages containing the search term. As well, having Google-esque searcheengine operators would help make the app far more useful. I’d love to search through Dropbox files to find relevant information as well.

While CloudMagic has a long way to go to be something all-encompassing, its current implementation is very useful for users of Google and Twitter. It even manages to out-Google Google in its universal search of Google services, something that Android surprisingly lacks. This is a very useful tool for Android owners.