MORTAL KOMBAT X Review

MORTAL KOMBAT X Review

May 21, 2015

Simply put, it’s Mortal Kombat X. Enough said.

There are two modes, Battle and Faction Wars, with a new one — Raiden Challenge — coming soon. It unfolds in a fairly logical manner; in the base form, one has a set of three fighters, and takes on three enemy fighters in a war of attrition. In Battle Mode (where I spent most of my time), the 3v3 paradigm is on full display.

The engaging aspect is obviously the stable of MK universe characters to pick from. Yes, originals like Sub-Zero and nemesis Scorpion are here, as are Cage and Kitana. There are some relative newbies too. D’Vorah, to say the least, is creepy. Combat is a matter of battling till the life bars go dry, and the side with a combatant(s) still standing wins the round. Attacking is effected by tapping and swiping, so battling is usually accompanied by a flurry of virtual screen action.

Within this battling system are a few more elements that add some depth. One can switch out fighters on the fly, such that if, in the middle of a match, one can pick another fighter that, say, matches up better with a particular opponent. Finishing a allows for allows one to get to the next, and yeah, there are bosses. Fatalities are present, and winning accrues payouts which can be used to improve individual fighters (an aspect that can be expedited with real cash).

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In Faction Mode, one can go toe-toe with other players online for prizes and leaderboard dominance.

It comes together well. The characterizations are gritty, and even the familiar folks are done up in a fashion that ups the menace factor. The fighting is great, if a bit one-dimensional, and the card elements are not overly pronounced during gameplay. The controls are okay, but still feel like something is missing in translation. That could be due to my console history with the title.

It’s a nice port, definite;y passable, and with enough console tie-ins (reward unlocking, hello?), it’s a great game for franchise fans and future fans alike.

Three Games From Gameloft are Available for Amazon Fire TV

Three Games From Gameloft are Available for Amazon Fire TV

Apr 8, 2014

FireTV

Fire TV is a new smart TV solution from Amazon that gives even more features to the plain old living room TV screen. One of these features is the ability to play selected Android games, and Gameloft has optimized its bestselling titles for exactly that purpose. These titles are Asphalt 8: Airborne, Despicable Me: Minion Rush and Modern Combat 4. Fire TV is already available in the US.

Android-Based Micro-Console M.O.J.O. is Available For Purchase

Android-Based Micro-Console M.O.J.O. is Available For Purchase

Dec 18, 2013

M.O.J.O 3

M.O.J.O. is a small console with big aims. Similar to OUYA, but seemingly absent from its issues, it allows the user to play any Android-based game on the big screen, with an access to Google Play and Nvidia TegraZone stores. It comes with a bluetooth controller that can also be used with an on-screen cursor, giving the console some much-needed versatility. More details and ordering are here: Mad Catz Website.

OUYA Gets A Big Update

OUYA Gets A Big Update

Nov 22, 2013

OUYA 2

The Android console has issued a new update with changes too numerous to count. They include an external storage open beta, allowing the use of USB drives, full interface revamp, making the console a lot more comfortable to use, an update system, called “incremental updates”, making updates come a lot quicker than earlier, and a lot more. Get the full list here: OUYA Abominable Snowman update on OUYA.tv.

GameStick Console Release Date Is Announced

GameStick Console Release Date Is Announced

Sep 19, 2013

TV on wall photo
GameStick is an interesting Android project that hooks up to a TV-set and can be used to play all of the games Android systems have to offer. A final release date has been confirmed, and it’s Tuesday, 29th October in the year 2013. GAME, Gamestop and Amazon are among the official retailers for the console, with official launches being confirmed for other parts of the world, as well. The details about the console can be found here: Game Stick Official Web-site

BlueStacks Goes From Android Apps on PC to Android Games on TV With the Upcoming GamePop Console

BlueStacks Goes From Android Apps on PC to Android Games on TV With the Upcoming GamePop Console

May 31, 2013

BlueStacks, known for their Android app emulation on PC and Mac, is pivoting a bit with the announcement of their new GamePop console. Planned to release this winter, the console will use a subscription-based model for its games, where people pay $6.99 per month for unlimited access to games, with titles from publishers like Com2us getting featured. They’re running a promotion at the moment where those who preorder the device by signing up for a year of the $6.99/month subscription will get the console for free, in a promotion running until June. Not a bad deal since the console will run $129.

This is BlueStacks entering an increasingly-crowded market segment though, and one that has yet to prove itself in any meaningful way. After all, Ouya isn’t even out yet to the general public, and there’s GameStick out there as well as those HDMI-toting dongles that can theoretically play games. Bluestacks is also minimizing the focus on its PC/Mac Android emulator, it seems – which is bad news for Windows tablet owners. Will this pivot with a subscription model on an Android gaming console actually work? We’ll find out this winter.

KickStarter Spotlight: Ouya

KickStarter Spotlight: Ouya

Jul 11, 2012

It is hard to escape the hype around Ouya, the latest great potential savior to console gaming since OnLive. Fortunately for Ouya, it has more possible staying power and a better foundation then OnLive ever did. Seeing the obvious need to lower the entry level for console gaming developers, Julie Uhrman – with a resume that lists high up positions at IGN, GameFly, and Vivendi – had the idea for Ouya, an Android based $99 gaming console that promises that every game at least has portions of free content. The whole business plan is based on having games that are sold similarly to the Android Market and App Store where games generally come in a Lite form and them a Premium upgrade. I like the idea of making large format, high definition games for the $10 and under price range, because, as fun as Angry Birds is on a 3.5″ screen, it doesn’t compare to experience of playing on the living room TV. Also, because Ouya is a console, strictly speaking, it mercifully comes with a controller which adopts the superior button layout of that on the Xbox 360.

One of the biggest and most publicized aspect of Ouya is the fact that it is completely open for hackers and programmers to have their way with it. Of course, it comes with a standard and very attractive OS, but Uhrman was not shy in inviting the programming community to unleash their creativity onto the device. This idea extends to game developers as there is no longer an expensive SDK to download or license to buy; a game can literally be created in the attic overnight on the existing Android platform that has proved so fruitful for games and other apps. The Ouya KickStarter page makes it perfectly clear that this console is not simply to be used to port over existing Android games, even though that option is exciting because there are plenty of great Android games that could greatly benefit from a tactile controller. It is also noted that games are not the only options for this console, and as it becomes more popular it is a safe bet that popular media companies like Netflix will port their Android app over.

And really, I see Ouya becoming much more successful then the struggling OnLive simply because it doesn’t need big name companies to adopt it initially. Once it inevitably gains steam from ported games and indie developers, the larger companies such as EA, Gameloft, and other traditional console heavy weights will follow suit just as they did a few years ago with mobile gaming. Mojang has already committed Minecraft and their other titles to Ouya and given companies like Netflix and Spotify’s tendency to embrace any platform under the sun, major adoption of Ouya does not seem too far off. Also, the $99 price tag almost makes Ouya available for even an impulse purchase, and the promise of cheap/free games is an invaluable selling point.

So brace yourselves, the gaming revolution may very well be upon us.