Siege Hero Review

Siege Hero Review

Aug 6, 2013

It really seems that “throw the rock, destroy the castle” type games faded in popularity as soon as their most popular example – Angry Birds – did. Which is a shame, because destruction-based games are my favorites, and seeing more of them on the market is a great thing. Granted, they’re more or less all the same, with a couple of tweaks here and there, but to me, they’re all precious. So, I was pleasantly surprised to notice Siege Hero, a new physics-based Crash The Castle styled physics puzzler.

Siege Hero is a light game that borrows 90% of its gameplay from Crash The Castle (from the same developer, Armor Games), which puts it at about the same level as Angry Birds. This game is a lot simpler, though, since it doesn’t even require aiming. The player has an array of projectiles, which should be flung by tapping on any point of the structure that needs to be restructured to the ground. The goal isn’t to destroy everything on the level, though, but simply to kill whatever enemy forces are standing in there. If possible, sparing the neutral units. Siege Hero spans through the ages, with each new level pack being situated at different points in history, and boasting some new mechanics and challenges. Siege Hero isn’t particularly difficult to complete, although completing the levels, beating the gold medal is a bit tricky, and requires some thinking around.

Siege Hero 2As the game progresses, new projectiles become available, and can be used to demolish a great deal of the structure. By the way, the game features bombs, which can be used to demolish the building quickly and completely, but which are very rare to obtain, and mostly can only be purchased with real-world money, which is a bit of a downside. It’s totally possible to beat and enjoy the game without spending a cent, though, since the levels, even the trickiest ones, are still possible to pass, after a bit of careful planning, and dozens of failed tries.

Overall, I’d say Siege Hero is alright. I didn’t find it as fun as some of the other games of its kind, but it’s a simple, positive game, and in my opinion, its price pays off quite well. Speaking of which, the game isn’t free, and requires unlocking it for a dollar, to play further than the first world. Still, it’s pretty fun.

Namco Brings 4 Games To Nook Color’s App Store

Namco Brings 4 Games To Nook Color’s App Store

Apr 27, 2011

Barnes and Noble’s Android-powered Nook Color is becoming more than just an e-book reader. The tablet has gotten an official update to 1.2 of the Nook software, designed to enable a variety of new features, including an update to Froyo, Flash support, as well as an app store. This does not mean official Android Market access, but there are a variety of Nook-enabled apps and games that are being released for the tablet through their official store.

Namco is jumping to the forefront of the Nook game market, with 4 Android games being released for the Nook’s app store, designed to be played on the device. First up is Flight Control, Firemint’s popular path management game, developed by Namco for Android. Next, there’s Crush the Castle, the physics-based puzzler, based on the eponymous Flash game, that has you trying to topple castles and their inhabitants by launching objects using a trebuchet. Next, there’s More Brain Exercise, featuring the famed Dr. Kawashima, who has become the face of the brain training genre. This game contains a variety of tests and games that claim to work different regions of the brain. Finally, there’s Learn to Fly, which puts you in control of a penguin who someday hopes to fly, like a real bird!

It seems as if publishers and developers are attempting to draw attention to their games through releases for specific devices – look at this news of apps for the Nook Color, as well as all the various games releasing on the Xperia Play. Drawing attention to Android apps is tricky enough as it is, and it helps if developers have some kind of external draw to their apps, through some kind of device. This is at least what developers and publishers are starting to bank on, and hopefully it succeeds for those looking to make Android more of a viable platform to do business on with their games and apps.