République Review

République Review

Oct 24, 2014

We’ve been wanting this one for a while.

And now that Republique is on Android, we can breathe a sigh of relief. We can stop giving Camouflaj and Darkwind Media the side eye. And we can taste of the goodness that this title unabashedly brings.

The gameplay comes in two modes: Story, which allows players to experience the story and explore environments, and Normal, which is the standard experience. Going the normal route allows one to pick an episode, and we’re off.

The opening sequence is interestingly tricky, and ominously transports the player to the persona of a person receiving communicating with a mysterious person named Hope. The dialogue helps bring the player up to speed, and we also get a feel for the gesture controls while finding out the negative nature of Hope’s dwelling. Prizrak are to be avoided, and this is where the stealth maneuvering comes into play. The elements come together, with visual cues and collectible items. The hacking concept works, giving multiple views that can assist with advancement, and helpers are cloaked in pieces that work into the gameplay.


As pointed out, stealth actions are key; as such, carelessness leads to failure, which manifests in being “caught” and returned to a secure room.

Simply put, the graphics are well done. From the opening sequence, one gets a sense that a lot of attentions was paid to the idea of the graphics helping to carry the storyline along. Fear and desperation almost literally are baked into the pixels, and the net effect of the animations as purveyed through the unique camera views is an experience best played to really be enjoyed. The darkness is palpable, but the little things are represented very well.

Where the game excels is the ability to drag one in. Before long, the quest to avoid “recalibration” almost becomes tangible; Hope’s saga becomes our own. What really resonates are the underlying themes of totalitarianism and surveillance, and these issues weigh heavily on the minds of people today.

It’s a well-crafted caper, with subtle salutes to Orwellian topics. The season pass opion is a plus, and I like idea of easter eggs and commentary from the directors show how much the developer looks to engage the audience.

Which is just dandy, by the way, because resistance is sweet, but sticking to the man is always so much fun.

République Arrives on Android

République Arrives on Android

Oct 23, 2014

Some games are worth waiting for.

Yeah, okay. We want République NOW!

The venerable, well regarded stealth action thriller is finally on Android courtesy of Camouflaj and Darkwind Media, and it brings all the goodness iOS users have enjoyed exclusively till now.

It tells the tale of futuristic totalitarianism, and in this, it feels scarily relevant today. Using a unique view mode, the user is compelled to help our heroine, Hope, to escape a secure facility. Influences from classics like 1984 are clearly seen in the storyline.

Developed over five years by industry veterans (Metal Gear Solid, Halo, F.E.A.R.), RÉPUBLIQUE is a thrilling and topical stealth-action game that explores the perils of government surveillance in the Internet Age.

You receive a call from Hope, a woman trapped inside a mysterious totalitarian state. By hacking into the nation’s elaborate surveillance network and taking control, you guide Hope through a web of danger and deception across five thrilling episodes.

Have we said we’re excited?

We will be publishing our review based on a full pre-release version shortly; we also had the great opportunity to talk to Camouflaj chief Ryan Payton and Darkwind Media head Matthew Mikuszewski. The interview was a blast, and we look to get that out soon too.

République is available on the Play Store for $2.99 (with additional in-app purchasing). It’s also available on the Amazon Appstore for $1.99.

Kona’s Crate Review

Kona’s Crate Review

Aug 18, 2011

For anyone who’s ever shopped online and found themselves gazing longingly at their front porch or mailbox, wondering, “Where’s my package? Where could it be?” to the point of near-psychosis, now’s your turn to be on the other side of that scenario. As Chief Kona’s delivery person, your mission is to pilot a rocket-powered platform carrying Kona’s crate through a twisting obstacle course filled with hazards and dangers untold. Get Chief Kona his crate under a set time, and you’ll earn yourself 3 stars for the effort.

The premise is about as wacky as you can get, and as much as the theme and setting are completely “out there,” it makes for a much better experience than, say, a generic, physics-based game set in the empty void of space, or among soulless, geometric shapes. Of course, that’s until you allow your mind to wander towards some darker, “Se7en” inspired territory as you wonder, “What’s in the box?” It’s probably better that we don’t know.

Controlling the platform is easily accomplished by tapping either side of the screen. Getting it where you want it to go, however, can be a hair-tearing experience. Touching the left side fires the left rocket while the ride side fires the right rocket. Touch both sides and each rocket fires at the same time, giving you maximum thrust. Once you become proficient with the finer intricacies of moving the platform around, you’ll find yourself capable of doing flips, rolls and quick directional changes without dumping the crate, which is extremely easy to do. Dump the crate, and the level is pretty much failed, because there’s no way to pick it back up.

Where the game gets especially tricky is when you accidentally nudge the crate slightly to one side of the platform. Suddenly, you’ll find that the platform becomes incredibly unstable, tipping easily and near-impossible to control. What a sense of accomplishment you’ll feel if you can actually get it to its destination, though!

There isn’t too much to complain about in Kona’s Crate, except that it can get a bit tedious. Depending on your stamina, you might not want to deal with more than 85 levels of nail-biting stress and frustration. Odds are, though, you will. You’ll be compelled to keep trying long after you might think you’re done with the game. It definitely hits that, “Just one more try, I’m sure I’ll get it this time!” spot.

One nice touch is that the environment changes slightly as you progress through each of the 4 “worlds” (plus one world of bonus stages). You’ll notice that each has its own theme, such as “Sunny Skies,” “Dusk,” “Starlight” and “Stormy Skies.” As you might guess, the lighting and background changes in each theme to reflect the time of day and environmental conditions. It makes for some diversity.

Throw in the extra challenge of OpenFeint achievements and the promise of more levels to come and you’ll find that there’s plenty to do in this game. Now, if we could just get Chief Kona to stop ordering so much stuff, online. Seriously, what’s in the box?