US Army Zombie Slayer 2 Review

US Army Zombie Slayer 2 Review

Nov 13, 2017

Say it with us: “Zombies never get old.”

It’s true. Another day, another zombie outbreak, another hero needed. ready to take the mantle? Check out US Army Zombie Slayer 2: The Zombie Hunter Returns. Yes, this mouthful is the sequel to US Army Zombie Slayer 3D 2017.

The graphics are gritty enough, perceived in landscape first person perspective. The visuals comprise of cityscapes to start, providing plenty of area to explore. There is plenty of movement, and effects to advance the gameplay.

Gameplay? Not rocket science, really: it has a few different modes, and take out the zombies before they have you for a snack. To avoid becoming nutrition, you should look to master the controls, which comprise of virtual buttons for movement, shooting and swinging your torso round. You get to pick out a weapon, and after a learner session to get used to it all, it’s off to the battling.

One of the best parts of the action is the virtual map, which shows where the undead are in relation to you; this way, you can go find them, and even make strategic decisions as to who to hunt first. The creepers make heir way slowly, and have lifebars that you want to deplete as quickly as possible — headshots are especially lethal.

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Ah, but watch out for the quick ones. Giant rats, spiders and other animals are also infected. Doing well and clearing levels yields game cash, which can be used to unlock better weapons. Feeling impatient? Real cash can be used.

It’s definitely not a bad shooter; as noted it, it includes the basics, such as swarms of enemies, diversity of monsters, upgrade paths and more. With regards to the gameplay, it feels quite familiar, but doesn’t have some of the refinements some may expect in such first person shooters. For instance, the sight mechanism is very basic as is the method of swinging round. Now, one could argue that it just gives the game a bit more of a challenge, but when compared to other games, it might feel a tad rudimentary.

When it comes a quick-hitter, this just might do the trick. Why? Zombies never, ever get old.

Into the Dead 2 Review — the sequel

Into the Dead 2 Review — the sequel

Oct 31, 2017

Into the Dead 2, from Pik Pok, looks to give us another reason to revel in zombie-mania.

Graphically? It’s a slick affair, with shadowy looks and amenable first-person stylings. The animations are just as smooth as we’d expect them to be, and the sound effects are quite apocalyptic.

The game incorporates short clips to advance the storyline and frame the gameplay; essentially, basic zombie trope is used, and you have to guide the player character to make it through infested space to rescue other survivors… as well as living to see another level.

As already noted, the main action is taken first person, you are armed with weapons, and you run forward by default, continuously, as soon as the level is started.. As you run through, zombies rise and/or walk towards you, and you can shoot or avoid them somewhat — as you should, as they will kill you if they get a hold of you. If you’re able to make it to a specific distance, you complete the level, and open up a new one.

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The game goes on as such… make the distance (hopefully), get the rewards, build up and improve your arsenal, rinse and repeat. To be fair, it doesn’t plod along; there is something to be said for the need to approach each run with a willingness to strategize. As noted, the ammunition is limited, and it probably isn’t prudent to depend on running through munition crates that may or may not have a troop of undead around it; as thus, you might wanna look to pick and choose engagements versus looking to dart and pick the better part of valor.

With regards to the upgrades, they do essentially become very necessary as you progress, because the flesh eaters get craftier, and the run thresholds get higher. Real cash can be used to expedite your ability to get ahead faster, but with some patience, real money need be used, especially since completed levels can be replayed for extra goodies.

The extras are done well too, with special levels, goodies crates and more spread throughout.

Simple, tried and true, yes, but enjoyable nonetheless.

Tower Defense Battle Zone Review

Tower Defense Battle Zone Review

Oct 19, 2017

Just because it’s been done — and done well — doesn’t mean we shouldn’t do it again, no?

Tower Defense Battle Zone called, and we answered.

If anything, it does look good. The graphics are vibrant but far from cartoon-y, and the use of color is pretty good, too. The game incorporates a top-down view for the “true” action, which reflects well in the default landscape orientation. The sound is better than just perfunctory, and at first glance, it is an appealing production.

Gameplay-wise, this one goes on and gets right to it. Yes… which is how it should be. You start out with a few basic wrappings that auto-fire, and the enemy come from the left, looking to make it all the way to breach your home base which is rightward.

The enemy, at the start, consists of motorized vehicles; the defensive units have different costs. Basically, you have to place the cannons strategically, and accumulate cash by destroying the enemy vehicles.

The usual tower defense opportunity costs apply: do you wait to accumulate enough cash to get the best cannons and risk getting overrun due to inadequate firepower, or do you spend the incoming cash on several smaller, cheaper units? Do you create banks of units, or lines and rows?

Decisions, decisions.

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The waves keep on coming, and, as expected, the enemy gets better. The game is leveled, and success yields game cash, which can (and should) be used to upgrade weapons. Real cash can be used to expedite operations, but doesn’t not feel mandatory.

Truth be told, this is a tough genre to stand out in, as there are many — so, so many — different titles to choose from. Tower Defense Battle Zone manages to have a few superlatives attributes that just might make it worth the while though.

As noted, the visuals are great, and the play form is about as straightforward as a gamer on the go could hope for. It is a fairly self-serving experience, in that it doesn’t need an advanced molecular theory degree to decipher, but is still avoids the ever-present trap of being overly simplistic.

Big Cruise Ship Games Passenger Cargo Simulator Review

Big Cruise Ship Games Passenger Cargo Simulator Review

Oct 9, 2017

Driving is cool.

Not cars… not necessarily. Let’s talk about tanks. Big rigs. Trains, even.

Boats? No, cruise ships. Now we’re talking. Like in Big Cruise Ship Games Passenger Cargo Simulator.

It’s decently done from a visual point of view, with good graphics and relatively smooth animations. There isn’t too much

Playing this one is quite straightforward. You get to control a long cruise ship, as advertised, and the idea is to dock it some distance away. To accomplish this formidable task, you get a virtual ship wheel and throttle, the one for bearing left or right and the other for moving at speed.

Now, you need to get the ship moving from point A to resting point B, which is usually a red-marked “parking” area. Between that, you get other ships, interesting topography and a beastly structure to guide, which provides the challenge. As an added tweak, you also have an optimal path to follow, notated by stars. Collecting all stars is the secondary goal. Now, said stars can be a stubborn foil, especially in the later levels, when they appear perilously close to, say, boulders and icebergs. At first, it is a slow going, by the way.

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The initial boat is fairly lowly rated with regards to speed handling, etc. Success yields coins, and these coins can be used to purchase ships that have better attributes.

If you are looking for something radically different from the host of vehicle manipulation games that are already on the Play store, you might be a bit disappointed; this one should be — has to be, really — accepted for what it is: a time waster first. The change of scenery makes for an interesting change of pace when compared to similar games, as does the type of vehicle.

As noted earlier, the speed and preciseness required probably prevent it from being a true furtive time-filler, but they pause button helps a bit. A wider array of ships (or some type of upgradability of a core ship) could really help with keeping folks coming back, but even as-is, it does possess a certain charm.

The Catapult Review

The Catapult Review

Oct 5, 2017

If we’ve said it once, we’ve said it a million times: give us life, give us liberty, and give us a good, down-to-earth time-waster. You know… a game suitable for furtive rounds during the boring meeting, or the doctor’s office, or maybe even between innings at the kid’s softball game.

So much spare time, and so little fun things to fill it.

And here is where a cool mobile game can make all the difference. Something like The Catapult, perhaps?

It comes across a very simple from a visual standpoint. You get the ubiquitous stickmen as main characters, and the background does not distract from the main action at all. The animations are clean, and the sound effects are equally decent.

This one plays in landscape. The action is straightforward, too. You, the player, are a stickman defending a castle, old-school style, with a boulder-launching catapult. Of course, there are opposing stickmen equipped similarly. Starting out, you play against the game engine, looking to hit the opponent on the right with a boulder.

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To fire the boulder, you pull and drag the primed catapult. If you’ve played any of the early Angry Birds games, this will come naturally. You can adjust the distance and path of the boulder by the “force” and angle of the pull.

And then, the basic idea is to get the enemy before he gets you. Boom, don’t celebrate too long, because there will be a new opponent appearing, usually at a different height than the last.

Then, just when you get good (hopefully), the game starts to throw in some wrinkles. Two opposing shooters simultaneously? Bring it. The game has two mode: the single player option, and a two player option that might feel a little cramped on smaller devices. Success yields coins, which can be for better shells.

Interestingly enough, even while bandying around the “time-waster” descriptor, I admit — almost reluctantly — that it somehow, some way feels like a bit more. The simple scoring method is easy tto keep up with, and the simple escalation process just makes sense.

Football Strike Review: “real” football on demand

Football Strike Review: “real” football on demand

Sep 21, 2017

Look, I love soccer. I coach it, still play it (somewhat, ha!) and watch it as much as I can. And with the major leagues back in full swing, I can do my commonwealth thing and enjoy referring to it as “real” football.

Yep, I was okay with formally checking out Football Strike – Multiplayer Soccer, a new one from Android all-star development house Miniclip.com. Very, very okay.

As one would expect from a Miniclip.com game, this one has high visual content. The soccer players, fs3containing environments and the like were all pretty well done, with matching sounds and effects that are equally of the standout variety. The animations work very well; ball flight and player movement look natural. The controls are intuitive, mostly consisting of free-screen taps and directional gestures.

The game plays in landscape, and this also works well.

The game tutor is front and center to begin. It starts out with a Shooting Race mode. Here, you learn the basics of shooting while racing against another character to smash through targets superimposed on the face of the goal for points. At the end of the allotted time, winner gets goodies. After working on that, you then get to try Free Kicks mode, which is fashioned after spot kicks. In this one, you go head to head with another player. You and your opponent alternate taking free kicks from different spots and controlling the keeper. Best of five, and again, winner get the jackpot.

After a particular player level is attained, Career mode is unlocked. This is a leveled adventure featuring different challenges, and you have to win to advance to the next one. The stuff here is inventive and familiar, featuring stuff already seen and a few new tricks.

The game also has a training section, and there are goodies that can be collected, and accumulated game cash can be used to procure better gear and such. Fun all the way round.

But alas, there is an energy requirement. This can be circumvented by real money.

Still, it is a worthy game, such that you don’t need need to be a soccer feen to enjoy it. You just might afterwards, though.

Sonny Review: it takes a zombie to beat a zombie

Sonny Review: it takes a zombie to beat a zombie

Sep 19, 2017

At this point, I think we all can agree that zombies do exist. No? Then why are they such a staple of our entertainment lives? Books. TV. Movies.

And games. Including mobile ones. Yes… it’s an undead world, and we just live in it.

So, coming up upon Sonny, a new-ish zombie fighting game from Armor Games, we figured it’s worth our time to give it a going over. For science.

It has great comic-inspired looks, with text boxes and audio that underscores the riveting storyline. We learn that there has been an outbreak, people are turning. Our narrator helps save a half-turned victim, who becomes Sonny. Remember Blade? Yep, Sonny has zombie attributes which help him combat them.

Action? This one brings turn-based battling with an RPG twist to the table. The game intro serves as a tutorial that allows you to figure out how to use our newly revived, somewhat undead hero. The battles are posed much like retro fighting games, with our hero on the one side and enemies on the other. Each group individuals has a lifebar, and the overarching goal is to obviously sap them of their lifesource before they can do the same to our dude.

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As noted above, fighting actions are turn-based. You, the player goes first, and then the CPU responds. So, a typical sequence involves our hero is accosted by an enemy (or enemies), and you go at it, one after the other, till someone is depleted. Doing well yields game cash, we can be used to unlock and sharpen several attributes and abilities.

As the action continues, and you lead Sonny to find a cure, it’s all about improving him to be able to match up with the increasing number of tougher enemies that begin to arrive.

It comes together nicely; it can be a bit of a challenge to creatively use such a tried and true such as the undead in a current mobile game, but in Sonny, it works relatively well.

Authoritarian thriller ‘Beholder’ adds features via update

Authoritarian thriller ‘Beholder’ adds features via update

Jul 31, 2017

Beholder (from Creative Mobile Publishing) is all about Big Brother and choice.

Don’t do it!

Or should you?

It’s shadowy — both physically and gameplay-wise — with great CYOA elements, and now, it’s getting an update.

The newest build brings cloud support (yay!); now, it is possible to pick up and play the same game across connected Android devices. Also notable in this update is that the app is slimmed down (according to the changelog, it is 260 mb smaller now).

There is also a new animation added, which allows players to see the lead character moving to a selected action.

Finally, there are bug fixes.

Now, we were somewhat smitten with Beholder when we took it for a spin way back when; we’d be selfish if we kept such goodness to ourselves. It comes in two flavors: free and full for $4.99.

[Our Beholder review]

Wordscapes Review

Wordscapes Review

Jul 10, 2017

Yes, yes… if we’ve said it once, we’ve said it a million times: we love “simple.” After all the hustle bustle of a zillion game types, sometimes, we all can do with a simple, easy-to-understand brain teaser to cool the brain off on.

A word game, perhaps? Something like Wordscapes, maybe?

Wordscapes uses simple graphics set in portrait orientation. The layout is simple enough, with the solved word section taking up most of the screen. Towards the bottom is a circle containing a word jumble, and then there are virtual buttons that serve as the controls around the main pieces.word3

It comes together much like the love child of a word search game and a crossword puzzle. It’s a leveled game, and each level starts with a set of letters, jumbled up. The idea is to glean words, and form them by tracing over the letters to correctly form the word; if the formed word is a correct one — and correctly spelled — it then automatically is applied to its spot in the crossword grid. The idea is to keep on going until the crossword area is completely full.

It starts out easily enough, with relatively short words that probably won’t tax the brain too much. The crossword element helps move the gameplay on, because the words overlap on the grid, and as such, with more correctly guessed words, there are more hints. The strength of the game, really, is the wealth of anagram sets, especially deeper in the game.

As one plays on, you might have to use the helpers: there is one for scrambling and one for hints. The former is great for re-mixing the letters, and the latter for filling in gaps. There are bonus squares, and some levels give you credit for finding words that are not part of the solution.

Again, simple does it. Words are fun again.

Oasis Games unleashes Fleet Glory on Google Play

Oasis Games unleashes Fleet Glory on Google Play

Jul 7, 2017

Fans of naval battles rejoice… Fleet Glory is here, courtesy of Oasis Games.

This one is a third-person view thriller that coaxes the player to join online PvP groups to do glorious naval battle. There is also a PvE option.

Excerpts from the press release:

Fleet Glory is a World War II-themed naval battle game featuring over 100 well-known warships of the era. Man ships ranging from destroyers to cruisers to battleships and relive historic naval engagements on classic maritime
match maps.

The game’s sea battles are stunningly realistic with dynamic weather systems and day- and night-time effects. Ambitious commanders can dial up the realism further by opting for manual pilot mode and assume responsibility for maneuvering the ship while continuing to direct fire

The game is free (with in-app purchases) on Google Play.

Last Day on Earth: Survival adds notifications, new localizations and more

Last Day on Earth: Survival adds notifications, new localizations and more

Jul 3, 2017

Kefir! has its fingerprint on a few popular games, and its latest — Last Day on Earth: Survival — seems to fit the fold quite nicely. It’s a survival game in the mold of Minecraft, but with a different view and more conventional graphics.

In this one, you keep busy. Think apocalypse… with zombies running around. You need to be able to build shelter, rummage for food and supplies, and fight off the undead and human marauders alike. Crafting, hunting, survival.

Now, even as we are giving it a go, it is getting enhanced via update.

The current build adds push notifications related to traveling on the global map and increases the durability of armor. Additionally, more folks different places can get in on the game, as new localizations have been added to the game — specifically Italian, German and French.

Also, per the changelog, there are changes in the recipe system.

Last Day on Earth: Survival is free (with in-app purchases) on Google Play.

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Bounzy! Review

Bounzy! Review

Jun 30, 2017

Time for Bounzy!.

In this one, you are a mage, and you are helping to protect a town. From what? Well, a host of scary beasts that look to do the town harm. You, the player/mage, are all that stands between the incoming creatures.

At your disposal are magical weapons that manifest much like fire bombs. The idea is to fire these bombs to destroy the enemy before they make it to the city gates. Now, it helps to know that every beast has a lifebar, and it generally takes more than one hit to take them out. Thankfully, the aforementioned magical weapon is a stream of fireballs that each inflict a degree of damage on the enemy.

The real gimmick, the thing the game gets its name from, is the bouncing walls. You see, the magic has the ability to rebound continually within the playing area, doing damage to damage-able things, on and on till they destroy all the enemies or are bounced back towards the bounzy3town where they dissipate. The mage character at the bottom of the screen, and the beasts march forwards. You shoot, and they move forward unless/until they are destroyed by the fire spells. As an added twist, the position of the mage changes randomly every go.

Shooting is performed by tapping, holding and dragging to specify direction, just like operating the catapult in Angry Birds. It’s all about physics, angling and figuring out how to create the most long lasting cascade of bouncing fireballs every round.

So, a typical series is easy to understand: a line of monsters appears. You shoot at them… but hey, do you look for the direct hit, or do you try to angle the line of ammunition off the wall to, say get behind that initial line and bounce off the back wall for multiple hits? Uh, oh a new line with more beasts; these ones have a higher tolerance and require more hits. Go for those, and ignore the easier to damage (but closer) initial beasts?

Decisions, decisions. You gotta decide quickly, because the city walls only allow for so many incursions before the level is failed. Interestingly enough, the game incorporates consumable special weapons, and as the game goes on, you get to encounter additional foils, like sided impenetrable shields. If one gets into a tight spot, there is a video-watching system that allows you to replenish special weapons.

Completing levels without getting the wall breached allows for you to earn goodies, and these goodies allow for upgrades; stuff like both ends of the weapon stream can be improved, as can the wall.

It looks and feels a bit like a pinball game joined with Tetris, with a bit of physics puzzler sprinkled in. It is an interesting mix, quite addictive with easy-to-understand upgrade path.

For what comes down to a tower defense game, it does pretty well. The charm sorta sneaks up on you, presenting several different elements that blend together pretty well, allowing a simple game feel a bit more like a more expansive experience. The video-watching weapon replenishment system could probably be limited to increase the challenge, but all in all, it’s a fine game.