Twin Moons from G5 is Free for the Next Week

Twin Moons from G5 is Free for the Next Week

Apr 15, 2014

Twin Moons 4

Twin Moons is a hidden objects adventure by G5 in which a scientist discovers a parallel world that can give people superpowers. G5 is giving it for free for the next week, so if you want to play this spooky puzzle, download it from here: Twin Moon on Google Play.

Explore a Castle in the Sky In Inbetween Land

Explore a Castle in the Sky In Inbetween Land

Mar 25, 2014

Inbetween Land 2

Inbetween Land is a new “hidden objects” quest from G5, in which the player must explore an unusual flying island that one day materialized in the clear skies, and find a girl that went missing there, finding the clues that she left behind. Weird spirits of extraterrestial inhabitants of the flying island included. Download Inbetween Land for free from here: Inbetween Land on Google Play.

Royal Trouble: Hidden Adventures is Free on Google Play Until February 23rd

Royal Trouble: Hidden Adventures is Free on Google Play Until February 23rd

Feb 21, 2014

Royal Trouble 4

Royal Trouble is a hidden objects quest about the two royal heirs who get trapped in a dungeon and need to get out of it, and then – find out who captured them, and for what reason. The game is free right now, so hurry up and download Royal Trouble for free from here: Royal Trouble on Google Play.

Mirrors of Albion Launches On Amazon

Mirrors of Albion Launches On Amazon

Nov 15, 2013

Mirrors of Albion 1

A new free-to-play game has been released on Amazon Appstore for all Kindle Fire owners out there. It’s a hidden objects puzzle with great graphics and differing game modes, set in London. The game is available for free from here: Mirrors of Albion on Amazon.

Where Angels Cry Review

Where Angels Cry Review

Aug 7, 2013

There should be a personal kind of hell for hidden objects games that don’t show you which things need to be collected. So far I’ve encountered only one such game, this one, but it’s already enough to drive a man crazy. Where Angels Cry isn’t a bad game – it’s quite original, if anything. But collecting a barely-seen object, when you don’t even know how said object should look like, is like searching for a straw at a straw factory.

The story of Where Angels Cry is a bit convoluted. The main hero is a monk, who was assigned to some distant monastery in Alps to investigate some strange happenings, including the disappearance of one monk, and a statue of an angel that suddenly started crying tears of blood. It’s a strange mix of a detective, mystery and mythical genres, and surprisingly, it works somehow. Although Where Angels Cry isn’t that different from other hidden objects games, its story is sufficiently interesting and mysterious to keep the player playing, despite sudden urges to throw the device at the wall in a fit of anger.

Where Angels Cry 5Okay, maybe I’m a bit overreacting, since Where Angels Cry isn’t that much more difficult than the rest of hidden objects games. It’s just that removing a comprehensive list of objects to collect means that the game turns from one of attention, to one of pixel-hunting. It basically demands the player to scan every pixel to find whatever object is needed. At the very least, it helps with the process: holding the finger on the screen and moving it around will spawn a small hand icon, or a magnifying glass, if it hovers over an object of interest. Screen can also be zoomed in and out by pinching or distancing two fingers on the screen. If searching for the required items and thinking about the next step isn’t enough of a challenge, there are also a couple of dozen cherub statues that are scattered across the levels, and finding them all will grant some additional sweeties.

Overall, Where Angels Cry is quite a fine and sufficiently challenging game. Although I thought it to be a bit short, it’s still a game of great challenge, and interesting story, which is enough for a hidden objects game.


The Tiny Bang Story Review

The Tiny Bang Story Review

Aug 1, 2013

It seems quite counter-intuitive that mobile puzzle games are as popular as they are. Puzzle games require three things: calm, stable environment, lots of free time on one’s hands, and a big screen to see every pixel. None of these are available to most of the mobile gamers, and yet, high-quality pixel-hunting puzzles and adventures are released every week, and it’s always a pleasure to pick a new one up. Tiny Bang Story is one of the puzzle games, available on the mobiles, and it also features a great gameplay quality, along with beautiful music and backgrounds.

Story in Tiny Bang Story is mostly visual, and is secondary to the gameplay. It’s still a bit blurry for me to describe, but the game takes place on a strange, steampunky land that was shattered by an asteroid impact, and now needs to be rebuilt by completing various puzzles and finding specific objects. Tiny Bang Story is a mix between a puzzle and a hidden objects game. Although the core gameplay consists of finding various objects that are required to advance into the world, and into the story, there are also plenty of puzzles and challenges that need to be completed. Since the game has virtually no written explanations or directions, which is itself an interesting feature, finding what to do next is quite a puzzle, as well. Tiny Bang Story is controlled by the usual clicking on everything suspicious, until the way forward is found. To draw some comparisons, I found this game to be quite similar to Machinarium, and the other Flash adventures.
Tiny Bang Story 1

Although pixel-hunting is made easy even on the smaller screens, by letting the player zoom in on the level, the controls aren’t perfect. The main problem is that there’s no clear way of saying, when the transition between different screens happens, so sometimes it’s a challenge to go where is needed, and sometimes – it’s a challenge to stay. I think that simply marking exits with arrows could have eliminated this problem. In any case, besides the slightly uncomfortable controls, the rest of Tiny Bang Story is almost perfect. Puzzles are challenging, but not particularly frustrating, the environments are rich in details and drawn quite marvelously, and the soundtrack is a beautiful instrumental arrangement. It’s everything one could expect from a portable puzzle game. Although the price tag can scare some people off, and it’s somewhat short – it can be finished in about a couple of hours – great quality makes it quite a worthwhile experience.