Bug Heroes 2 Review

Bug Heroes 2 Review

Aug 14, 2014

Bug Heroes 2 is a cool mix of tactical base building tactical shooter and cockroaches. What could go wrong?

Bug Heroes 2 is about bugs at war. Every slug and ant must do their part. The player moves their two bug team around in real time using an invisible virtual stick and attacking is handled automatically.

Screenshot_2014-08-12-16-50-52Depending on which bug is picked the player might blast away at distance or close in for some melee action. During combat grunt bugs like ants with rifles and siege engine grubs are constantly produced on both sides and go about attacking enemies automatically so the battlefield is always full of some matter of six legged carnage or another. The auto produced bugs really give the game a great feel as there is always fighting going on and watching armies of bugs clash is great fun.

Each bug the player controls has several skills that are the difference between winning and losing battles. The great thing is how different each character is. The Moth uses vital healing and buffing magic, while the Honey Bee is a sword and pistol armed officer type that boosts the skills of all grunts around him and has other skills that make his allies much stronger. He himself is weaker than the Cicada, who is a well armoured commando with a shotgun and offensive skills. Any two bugs can be used for the player’s team and strategies change a great deal depending on what they’re using. A large array of purchasable weapons and items, as well as permanent buffs are also available. Bug Heroes 2 has depth in spades.

Screenshot_2014-08-13-18-29-26Moving close to build spots at the player’s base allows construction of many different types of turret for defence, like sniper towers or machine gun towers. Other building types like additional unit production structures to crank out more grunts or shield bubbles to protect the base are also available. The sheer amount of turrets and options available is overwhelming and offers load of strategic depth. Smartly placing turrets, like putting short range cannons in front of sniper towers with a shield over it all to deflect incoming fire is important.
Besides normal battles where the first one to lose or their food or have their store destroyed is the loser the game also features survival type mission where the player must survive an onslaught of evil bugs using just their bugs skills and and wits

Between missions, new skills and buffs can be unlocked with coins gained from gameplay. New heroes also unlock randomly every few levels the player gains. Diamonds can be paid to unlock things early. Diamonds are premium currency, but there is no need to do so as things are unlocked at a good clip. Bug Heroes 2 has no nasty in-app purchases to speak of.

Bug Heroes 2 looks great. A cute but tough looking super-deformed style gives the game a unique look and combat looks great. Each character is full of personality and there is always something to look at. The sound is well done too. Weapons sound nice and beefy and combat sounds good. There is also some god music and a lot of speech which while repetitive is good to listen to.

Bug Heroes 2 is a highly polished, original game with no nasty freemium and tons of fun gameplay. Play it today!

I’m A Creepy Crawly is Released For Young Entomologists

I’m A Creepy Crawly is Released For Young Entomologists

Nov 22, 2013

I'm a Creepy Crawly 3

All the way from Ireland, I’m A Creepy Crawly is a bunch of mini-games under the flag of a popular childrens’ TV program about insects. They are quite simple and easy to grasp by the younglings, and are also bright and colorful for their interest. Check it out here: I’m A Creepy Crawly on Google Play.

Fruit Roll Review

Fruit Roll Review

Nov 30, 2011

I love a game that has instructions in the title. Fruit Roll is a game wherein you are a piece of fruit, rolling along. As you go you collect stars and roll over opponents. It’s fantastically straight-forward – you don’t even control the speed or direction of the rolling. It’s very charming in its simplicity, and another favourite for playing on the bus.

Fruit Roll has no plot, but it really doesn’t need one. As mentioned, you play as a piece of fruit, and each stage begins with you rolling across the screen. You cannot stop rolling, but you are able to jump. Jumping allows you to target and collect stars along the path. There are various other (non-sentient) fruit along the path and collecting them has benefits. There are different obstacles/enemies along the way, and the type of fruit you are determines whether or not rolling into them will knock them off the screen or cause you to come to a teary-eyed halt. Collecting three fruit of the same kind is a combo and not only will you change into that fruit, but a giant, rampaging version of that fruit. You’ll destroy everything in your path and have a much better shot at grabbing stars since you’re four times your regular size. The combo will run out however and you will return to your original fruit size. Each level becomes more difficult as the incline down which you’re rolling increases and so you roll much faster and with less control over your movements – one wrong jump could send you flying into the hands of an angry monkey and end your turn abruptly.

I really like this game for its lack of story. The fruit does have and needs no motivation to run over the caterpillars and red frogs in its path. Snagging the stars as you fly across the screen is rather addictive, like the coins in Mario, and is motivation enough.

Running into an opponent that you are not classed to knock off screen causes you to “die” and you are back to the first stage with none of your stars to show for it. This is the game’s real weak spot, as the only gameplay mode you begin with is Adventure (continuous play). There is apparently a mini-game mode, but it can only be reached by collecting 10,000 stars. This would happen soon enough if dying didn’t completely erase your store of stars each time. At a certain point this can become frustrating enough that it dampens the enthusiasm needed to keep rolling along. The game is fun, but needs more reasons to keep coming back.