Giant Boulder of Death Review

Giant Boulder of Death Review

Sep 30, 2013

There are two kinds of good games. Not really, but whatever. One is good games that are nicely done, feature unique gameplay elements and bear strong emotional impact. Another may feature none of those things, but it’s really satisfying. It’s like a cheap, bloody revenge flick, against Titanic, if Titanic was good. So, that’s the sort of game Giant Boulder of Death is. Well, the fact that the game itself is done pretty good, certainly helps.

Giant Boulder of Death 1Gameplay of Giant Boulder of Death is simple as a rock. It is actually about a rock. It’s about a giant, round rock that rolls downhill and breaks apart most of the things it hits. The player simply needs to steer its course to evade traps, walls and cliffs, and the rock does the rest. It’s an infinite runner, in a way, but with a lot more destruction. The boulder, as destructive as it is, shatters on impact with any dangerous material, which should be evaded at all costs. Thankfully, the rock can “jump”, however this works, so there’s almost always a way to evade the danger. The player should not only break as much stuff as possible, but also pick up coins that are scattered across the hill, as they are spent on upgrading the rock itself, as well as its power-ups. Once the rock destroys a certain amount of stuff, it gets a super-upgrade for a short time. While in this state, the rock gets a lot bigger and destroys absolutely everything in its way, so it’s a great score and coin-booster. This state can also be upgraded from the menu. There are many different mechanics like this in the game, so it’s pleasantly varied.

The visual design is simple, but stylish, looking very similar to Katamari Damacy. Giant Boulder of Death is generally very similar to that bright insanity, both in looks and in gameplay. Sound design is also surprisingly well done, and is among the few that I didn’t mute after five minutes of playing the game. So, wrapping up, Giant Boulder of Death is good. It’s mighty good. It’s so good, in fact, that I’m not really in the mood to right this review any longer, as there are still some hillbilly bastards that need squishing. Bye.