Cannon Cat Launches on to Nook Color and Nook Tablet

Cannon Cat Launches on to Nook Color and Nook Tablet

Jul 6, 2012

Loqheart’s Cannon Cat was well-received on the iOS App Store, not just by players, where it amassed over a million downloads, but received critical praise from Apple, as it was their iPad Game of the Week, and got a glowing review on 148Apps. Now the game is making the jump to Android, and it’s doing something interesting. One, the game is going from free to paid on Android. Generally, the reverse happens on Android due to the issues with making money off of selling apps directly to customers. However, Loqheart is planning on selling the game exclusively on the Nook Store for Nook Color and Nook Tablet for $2.99, to hopefully make money off of its game on Android the old-fashioned way.

Cannon Cat, for those that haven’t played the iOS version, is a puzzle game of sorts where players must launch a cat through perilous levels, trying to rescue floating goldfish and reach the end of the level intact. Powerups are available to help make that job just a little bit easier. Cannon Cat is available now.

G5 Entertainment Bringing Their Games to Nook Color and Nook Tablet

G5 Entertainment Bringing Their Games to Nook Color and Nook Tablet

Feb 17, 2012

G5 Games have announced that their games will be coming to the Nook Store. As developers and publishers are learning, the Android Market isn’t the only place to distribute games. There are plenty of secondary markets to work with as well, including prominent stores for tablet devices, like the Amazon Appstore for the Kindle Fire, and the Nook Store for the Nook Color and Nook Tablet. Their games have been releasing to the Amazon Appstore over the past few months, and now games will be releasing on the Nook Store. Three titles are planned to be released on the Nook Store: Stand O’Food, Supermarket Mania, and Mahjongg Artifacts. All games will be optimized to work with the Nook Color and Nook Tablet. These time management, strategy, and puzzle titles will release in the “coming weeks,” so Nook device owners will want to keep an eye out for these games on the Nook’s built-in store soon.

The Hills Are Greener: All I Want for Christmas is an Android Tablet

The Hills Are Greener: All I Want for Christmas is an Android Tablet

Dec 19, 2011

This promises to be a huge time of year for Android tablets: between the Kindle Fire being the most gifted item on Amazon, Barnes and Noble launching their new Nook devices including the Nook Tablet along with the still-on-the-market Nook Color. Plus, the Nook Touch is actually an Android device with an e-ink screen, and it’s actually possible to run Android apps on it after rooting it. This is very unsupported functionality, though. This is along with other cheap Android tablets that are on the market at bargain basement prices, and those high-end models at the iPad’s price point.

While sales will obviously be a huge barometer for the success of these devices, the other question will be quite simply if users will enjoy these Android tablets. Like it or not, the iPad is still the champion of the tablet market and what users are going to compare these tablets to. If the tablets don’t perform up to snuff, will people lose any faith in Android? The greatest fear that Google and other Android supporters have to have is that the current rush on Android tablets winds up creating a greater demand for tablets, but a dislike of the Android tablets released causes people to just be driven to the iPad. Long-term, these cheaper tablets may be bad for Android.

I personally have been telling friends interested in tablets that the iPad is a superior choice to the Android tablets. In particular, the smaller app selection on the Nook and Amazon stores represents a stumbling block, especially as even with Market access these tablets still pale in comparison to the iPad in terms of apps. Cost is a concern with them, and that is where Android tablets will succeed – being a fraction of the cost is a humongous selling point that the iPad just can’t compete with.

As one Twitter user pointed out, many tablets like the Kindle Fire are being given as gifts, and if users dislike them and start to try and return them or sell them secondhand en masse after Christmas, Hanukkah, and Festivus, then Android vendors could be seeing a lump of coal come next year when the next round of Android tablets come out.

Kindle Fire Rooted Immediately After Release

Kindle Fire Rooted Immediately After Release

Nov 16, 2011

The Kindle Fire is shipping, and many people already have it in their hands to use for their music, video, and reading content consumption. Of course, for a more dedicated set of users, they see a $200 tablet and think, “Why, this sounds like a swell piece of hardware for the price to tinker around with once it’s rooted.” Of course, who knows how long that could take, after all, there could be issues with getting root access, and who knows what else could pop up…

…oh wait, it’s been rooted already? Gee, that was quick.

Yes, according to Engadget, enterprising hackers have already figured out how to root the Kindle Fire. While this largely means that apps like Root Explorer (available from the Amazon AppStore!) will be able to explore the entire file system. The potential of what the device can now do is the real advantage of rooting. It would be possible for this to become a stock Android device soon. As well, with the source code for Ice Cream Sandwich now available, the potential for a true Android tablet experience on the device is quite possible.

Will Amazon leave this rooting hole open, though? While they might not want people getting away from their customized interface, designed to push Amazon services, an argument could be made to leave it open. This would be in the name of trying to drum up more interest in selling more tablets, but also in creating a word of mouth about the device. If hackers get to work on customizing the device, it will ultimately lead to more people talking about it. Getting people interested in the device and talking about it long after launch and the holiday period is a good thing, and will likely help out more than the revenue that would be lost if somehow Market access was enabled on he device. The Nook Color has been hacked to pieces, and the Nook experience able to be swapped for a stock Android experience. The device has done well enough for a new Nook tablet to be launched. Amazon might want to think twice before they make any possible move to close up the rooting hole.

Namco Brings 4 Games To Nook Color’s App Store

Namco Brings 4 Games To Nook Color’s App Store

Apr 27, 2011

Barnes and Noble’s Android-powered Nook Color is becoming more than just an e-book reader. The tablet has gotten an official update to 1.2 of the Nook software, designed to enable a variety of new features, including an update to Froyo, Flash support, as well as an app store. This does not mean official Android Market access, but there are a variety of Nook-enabled apps and games that are being released for the tablet through their official store.

Namco is jumping to the forefront of the Nook game market, with 4 Android games being released for the Nook’s app store, designed to be played on the device. First up is Flight Control, Firemint’s popular path management game, developed by Namco for Android. Next, there’s Crush the Castle, the physics-based puzzler, based on the eponymous Flash game, that has you trying to topple castles and their inhabitants by launching objects using a trebuchet. Next, there’s More Brain Exercise, featuring the famed Dr. Kawashima, who has become the face of the brain training genre. This game contains a variety of tests and games that claim to work different regions of the brain. Finally, there’s Learn to Fly, which puts you in control of a penguin who someday hopes to fly, like a real bird!

It seems as if publishers and developers are attempting to draw attention to their games through releases for specific devices – look at this news of apps for the Nook Color, as well as all the various games releasing on the Xperia Play. Drawing attention to Android apps is tricky enough as it is, and it helps if developers have some kind of external draw to their apps, through some kind of device. This is at least what developers and publishers are starting to bank on, and hopefully it succeeds for those looking to make Android more of a viable platform to do business on with their games and apps.