Visioneer Mobility Color Cordless Scanner Hardware Review

Visioneer Mobility Color Cordless Scanner Hardware Review

May 27, 2014

I want to be paperless.

No, seriously… I do. We live in a digital world, and it makes life easier. With different storage options, local and cloud, it just makes sense to make those documents take on a different life. Even if only from a backup standpoint, having digital documents is a must have.

One issue remains though. All that paper isn’t always generated/accumulated at home. One business trip alone can generate lots of paper, and even if one has a traditional scanner at home, manually scanning in stuff is sometimes more than a chore. What folks like me need is a truly mobile scanner. A smartphone might work in a pinch, but as anyone who has had a need to get a professional document digitized on the fly can tell you, sometimes, cellphone cameras simply don’t cut it.

This where the Visioneer Mobility Color Cordless Scanner (courtesy of Xerox) can be of service.

The review unit came boxed with power cord with adjustable prongs, software disk, 2GB microSD card and adapter, cleaning tool, mini-USB cable, and the scanner itself encased in a decent black carry case. First, it is really mobile, coming in at 11.54 x 2.82 x 2.07 inches and less than a pound and a half in weight. The review unit itself has a hard plastic exterior, with glossy white on top over a black body. It looks like a basic scanner would with power and feed buttons to the right, and SD, mini-USB and full USB ports at the back. The entire thing is infinitely portable, and has a nice design aesthetic.

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The unit came with what seemed to be a full charge, so I was able to get into using it immediately. The true draw is that it does not need a full-fledged computer to operate; scanning documents is easy and intuitive; with the device on, face-up feeding auto-launches the hardware, and the device stores the scanned documents to the included SD card. It does 300 ppi JPG or PDF too, and it is possible to scan directly in wired fashion to supported Android devices via USB debugging. The replaceable rechargeable battery ensures that wires can be left at home, and it boasts 300 scans before a recharge is needed. The quality of the scans is really good, and it handles paper 2 x 2 inches all the way up to letter-sized sheets.

An added optional benefit that Visioneer advertises that I was able to verify independently is Eye-Fi card functionality. A configured Eye-Fi card gives the scanner enviable wireless functionality that is really hard to beat, and makes it invaluable on the road.

It doesn’t do both sides of the paper at once; and I did feel that holding it a bit too hard could ding it up, but all in all, the Mobility Color is a great device that changes mobile productivity in a positive way. It makes one completely rethink the use of paper, and removes a major barrier to being completely digital.

Introducing Scanbot, a Mobile Document Scanner

Introducing Scanbot, a Mobile Document Scanner

Apr 15, 2014

Scanbot 2

Scanbot is a software that can scan any document, be it a receipt, business card, meeting minute, whiteboard note, or newspaper article, and produce a high-quality PDF on the fly. Naturally, you have to have a proper camera in your phone or tablet for that. The app can be purchased here: Scanbot on Google Play.

KickStarter Spotlight: ScanBox

KickStarter Spotlight: ScanBox

May 9, 2012

Scanners are annoying. They’re loud, slow, and take up an inordinate amount of desk space. Plus, there are driver updates and proprietary software to deal with. Most of my experiences when scanning has just been used informally to send a document or a sheet of notes over to another individual. These scans do not have to be professional quality, and speed is really an important factor. Also, if I am on the road or away from my desk, emailing a document is impossible. Well Australian designer David Evans has come up with an unique solution that for some people might totally replace their scanner at home called ScanBox. David’s design is an incredibly simple trapezoidal box with a base that is just big enough for a normal 8.5″x11″ piece of paper. Placing a smartphone on top and centering the camera onto the small slot allows for a steady, high quality look at the paper below. This is obviously for people who have higher resolution cameras and probably will not work for night owls with poor light.

For those who need to send multiple documents a day and need them to be of the highest quality, then ScanBox is probably not a good fit. However, most of us are just looking for a quick way to share that page of notes or a photograph with a friend, in which case ScanBox works great. ScanBox also allows for “scanning” of 3-D objects which is obviously something normal scanners cannot do. No more waiting for a computer to open the scanner software and load the attachment, everything is done instantly with any smartphone. Sending image files is not ideal, I understand. That is why there is a corresponding app, already on the Play Store, called CamScanner which takes those scans and automatically converts them to .PDF form. Also, this app allows for multiple page scanning, advanced image processing, upload to cloud storage, and much more. So ditch that scanner and help David Evans change the way people send documents forever, and like all KickStarter projects, ScanBox cannot become a reality without your help.

Remote Document Viewer and Editor CloudOn Makes Its Way to Android Tablets

Remote Document Viewer and Editor CloudOn Makes Its Way to Android Tablets

May 9, 2012

The cloud-based service for creating and editing Microsoft Office documents and viewing Adobe Reader files, CloudOn, is now on Android tablets after an iPad-exclusive run. This app lets users work in a real Microsoft Office environment on their tablets by connecting to the free CloudOn service. So Word documents can be edited in an actual version of Microsoft Word, spreadsheets in real Excel, and presentations in true PowerPoint, with the software running on CloudOn‘s remote servers. As well, CloudOn boasts one of the most robust PDF viewing experiences on mobile, with its cloud-based technology able to view even PDF files with embedded 3D modelling, unlike most if not all mobile PDF readers.

CloudOn can also boast that they have aleays been properly licensed, unlike competing solution OnLive Desktop, which had its recent issues with licensing. All files are saved to and are loaded from cloud storage services such as Dropbox and Box, making it easy to access finished or in-progress work seamlessly from any computer. Appropriately enough, Google Drive is supported in the Android launch of CloudOn.

As far as usability goes, it’s virtually identical to the iPad version, and the same user account will work between versions. Unlike OnLive Desktop, this is meant to be more of a native device experience than using a remote Windows computer. So, the app tries to hide the Windows experience underneath as much as it can. Scrolling works as a user would expect it to on a touchscreen, and text selection feels native as well. Right-clicking is available by tapping and holding on the screen. While the Android software keyboard does work with CloudOn, unlike the ineffective remote keyboard in OnLive Desktop, built-in autocorrect does not work, so users should take care when typing. Asus Transformer keyboard dock users should be at an advantage, as well as hardware keyboard users. Interested users can download CloudOn now for free for Google Play, though it is currently only for tablets.