Star Trek Timelines: Game on the Edge of Forever (Video of the Day)

Star Trek Timelines: Game on the Edge of Forever (Video of the Day)

Aug 8, 2016

Here’s a fun one for Trekkies (and specifically Star Trek Timelines feens): a new video from developer Disruptor Beam.

Why?

With the 50th Anniversary of the Star Trek franchise only a month away, the mobile game company Disruptor Beam today released a new video explaining the enhancements, changes and upcoming plans for Star Trek Timelines, the mobile game that lets players assemble a crew of their favorite popular characters from the series, including James T. Kirk, Jean-Luc Picard, Data, Worf and boldly explore the deep reaches of the galaxy.

Released at Star Trek Las Vegas this past weekend, the video discusses how Star Trek Timelines was originally envisioned as a Star Trek fan’s dream of uniting their favorite franchise characters to experience all that Star Trek had to offer, along with how the game has evolved since its launch in January.

Check out the video below:

Swype Keyboard Gets Star Trek Themes and More via Update

Swype Keyboard Gets Star Trek Themes and More via Update

Aug 27, 2015

Swype Keyboard is looking to improve the experience for its users, as evidenced by its latest update, which should please Trekkies everywhere.

Per the Google app page:

WHAT’S NEW

v2.0:
Emoji Keyboard
New Swype Store with premium themes featuring Star Trek
New Languages – Lao and Uzbek Latin
Improved auto-correction
Various crash and bug fixes (thanks for reporting!)

We had an opportunity to review the well regarded keyboard soon after it became available on Google Play, and liked it; it is available for $0.99, and there is a limited-time free trial.

[Our Swype Keyboard Review]

Star Trek Trexels Review

Star Trek Trexels Review

Jun 8, 2015

Star Trek Trexels is one of those games that, right off the bat, has something immense going for it: a backing franchise that almost demands one try out the game.

We did.

The game is a glorious ode to games past; graphically, it delights in its chunky looks, exuding a retro feel that mostly defines the game. It uses text bubbles as a means to convey dialogue, and the animations do what one would expect of them in a game that uses such a design scheme.

The immortal George Takei lends his voice to our journey, and his booming voice is close to the perfect compliment outside Leonard Nimoy (RIP).

The game starts with excitement, and the arrow-driven tutorial rolls along simultaneously: we see a Federation Starship — the USS Valiant, to be exact — take on a bunch of belligerent ships in the Trexellian Expanse. While learning the basics of combat, we see the Valiant take on one serious enemy that easily destroys it. Trekkies will be able to guess who this foes is, no doubt.

stt1

The Federation then dispatches the player to get a starship to investigate the disappearance.

The game leads players through the different elements; the aforementioned combat can occur on a ship-to-ship level or mano a mano/crew vs crew on planetary ground. In any case, the game employs cubes to effect attack and healing process. Picard fans need not fret about the Kirkisms, because there are occasions when negotiations become an element to be practiced.

As one goes on, the game reveals itself to be a management simulation with building elements at its core. The player has to recruit officers, train them and such, while improving/fixing the ship and doing the whole going “where no man has gone before.” What makes it work is the variety of gameplay; one is able to get into different stuff (like collecting dilithium crystals… cool stuff) and keep many pieces moving simultaneously. There is an energy requirement, and some portions that are based on leveling up. Real money can be used to supplement the game currency system, and helps expedite some iconic, uh, icons.

Still, for the experienced gamer, it might feel like a lot of the same. There’s no ignoring the franchise power, but there isn’t a lot of new stuff, and there might be a dichotomy of experience for different type of folks.

When it’s all said and done, it’s a fun endeavor with cool aspects that brings Star Trek to life in mobile devices.

Star Fleet Deluxe Review

Star Fleet Deluxe Review

Aug 28, 2014

Star Fleet Deluxe is a tactical game that apes Star Trek more than a little. Taking command of a huge starship, the player stands alone against a huge force of murderous aliens, hell-bent on eradicating any and all humans in the galaxy.

Star Fleet Deluxe is a very in-depth, turn based strategy game. The game takes place over a huge area, 81 quadrants of galaxy space to be precise, filled with stars, colonies, planets and starbases.

Screenshot_2014-08-24-21-18-32Star Fleet Deluxe has the player defending a vast universe. Using a slick icon based control system, the player zooms around the universe, seeking out and destroying the warlike Krellan that serve as the game’s primary foes.

Combat is quite in-depth. The player has both phasers and torpedos at his/her disposal and after targeting an enemy the intensity of phasers or the number of torpedos in the spread can be controlled. This allows the player to either destroy or disable targets. Disabled targets can be towed back to a starbase to capture the ship and take prisoners, both of which are usually required for mission objectives.

Screenshot_2014-08-24-16-21-35As the player cruises the universe, reports come in of colonies and starbases coming under attack. Colonies must be protected and starbases, while armed, may need aid as well. Both starbases and planets can resupply the player, so keeping them safe is important to surviving as well as passing the mission. Colony defence and supply management is the whole point of Star Fleet.

Unfortunately Star Fleet Deluxe sucks every iota of fun out of the gameplay with its insistence that every single vessel and base is destroyed in the time limit. It is extremely disheartening to spend twenty minutes on a mission, only to fail because one or two enemy bases on planets couldn’t be found in time. Never mind the fact the player just destroyed 40 ships single-handedly and saved all colonies and starbases, if there’s a single enemy ship or base anywhere, the mission is failed and the game must be started from scratch. This is terrible. There is no need for this exactness. Why not simply base it on the amount of met objectives rather than having to get every single one?

Also the way that boarding combat is handled is completely arbitrary. There is absolutely no control over it. Space Marines may simply flat out fail to take the smallest fighter or take it with nearly no causalities.

Star Fleet Deluxe’s graphics aren’t special at all. Like many strategic games the player spends most of their time reading text and thinking, not gawking at graphics. Star Fleet has a very good interface with plenty of detailed reports to help the player keep on top of their task. A series of icons is used to execute orders and it works very well.

Star Fleet Deluxe is a good strategy game that demands perfection just a little too much. With a less draconian mission structure this game could be great, but it is still a competent strategy game and worth playing.

Disruptor Beam Reveals Upcoming Game, Star Trek Timelines

Disruptor Beam Reveals Upcoming Game, Star Trek Timelines

Apr 11, 2014

This new Star Trek game is a social role-playing game. Players will be able to scout the universe on a spaceship, meet all of the heroes from all editions of Star Trek universe, while getting into exciting adventures. More details about the game can be found here: Star Trek Timelines on Facebook.