EvoCreo Review

EvoCreo Review

Aug 6, 2015

There’s no going around it, so I’ll just say it. EvoCreo is a blatant Pokemon ripoff. It’s a copy of the Pokemon Red down to the T. Or, at least it seems a lot like that to me, since I never actually followed the endless franchise that Pokemon became. EvoCreo has all the same mechanics, all the same gameplay – hell, even the geography is a lot like the Pokemon. It is, for all intents and purposes, a Pokemon game, except with all obvious references cut and replaced by weirdly-named placeholders. But here’s the most interesting part: EvoCreo is actually pretty good.

For those that don’t know anything about the Pokemon, it’s basically a very simple turn-based tactical action, where the player needs to collect various weird creatures and then battle them against the enemy creatures. Each creature type has unique stats and abilities, and the creatures can level up and evolve into their more powerful selves. There’s quite a lot of management involved, so it’s very easy to become OCD about the stuff. As I mentioned, EvoCreo is exactly the same. The player EvoCreo 2takes a role of a boy/girl who travels all over a given region, gets involved with various stories, visits various places, inhabited and wild, and of course, collects a bunch of critters that will fight for him against their own kind.

EvoCreo is actually pretty fun, and copies Pokemon so perfectly that you can’t even blame it for its plagiarization, and start to actually admire its efforts. Although the creatures aren’t as memorable as the Pokemon, they’re still pretty well designed, and have different stats and abilities – there’s even 130 of them. The battles are also the same: the player can use one of his creature’s abilities, switch it for another one, use one of his items, or attempt to flee the battle. If the battle is won, the player and his creature get some experience points that allow them to level up and learn new abilities. There’s also a store that allows the player to purchase various stuff, although for some reason, I couldn’t access it – but I’m willing to write it off as a single-time bug.

Overall, EvoCreo is an almost perfect copy. So, if you’re a fan of the Pokemon and want to play it on your Android device, or simply want to see what all the fuss is about, you can try out EvoCreo. At least it’s easier than to buy a Nintendo.

Fortress Fury Review

Fortress Fury Review

Aug 2, 2015

Fortress Fury seems like it should have been released more than 5 years ago, back when Angry Birds were still kinda popular, since this seems like a logical evolution of the concept. Fortress Fury lets the player build his own fortress, arm it with various medieval weapons and fight off against the enemy fortress, trying to destroy its core while keeping your own intact. It’s very fun, and while the game looks a bit overwhelming on the first try, it’s actually fairly easy to grab a hold of.

There are two primary parts in Fortress Fury. The first part is constructing the fortress itself. The process is simple and complex at the same time. The “fortress” is a vertical, rectangular patch of squared space that the player can fill in with blocks of different material, as well as with special parts. There is a number of upgrades that the player can purchase, some of which unlock the new blocks, while others improve the stats of those that are already unlocked. The material blocks are pretty straightforward, serving as the basis for the tower, and protecting the important bits. The special blocks are all different and serve different goals. The most important special block is the Fortress Fury 3tower core. If this block is destroyed, the whole tower falls apart, so this block should be protected at all costs. Its unique ability is that it can disguise itself as any other block, so the enemy never truly knows where it’s situated.

Another important block is the armor that, when activated, can protect a certain amount of blocks from being damaged. There’s a bunch of other special blocks, which can be unlocked, but have to be put sparingly, since the more powerful blocks player puts on his tower, the heavier it gets, and there’s a maximum possible capacity to a tower, meaning the player should try to conserve his resources, or make sacrifices. Finally, there are the actual weapons. They are simple static ballistas and catapults, with the exception of the front archers, which evolve over the course of the battle, and later on become huge monstrosities, chunking blocks of land at the enemy. The aiming and shooting is the same simple drag and release action that was in Angry Birds, their spin-offs, and influences. The game tends to become spammy, but it still has a strategy requirement to it, combining perfectly the player’s ability to design a great fortress, and his ability to aim his troops for the enemy.

Overall, Fortress Fury is really fun, although it does require some concentration and dedication. It’s easily one of the funnest free-to-play strategies I’ve seen, and is a great example of why free-to-play system doesn’t automatically equal frustrating and dumbed-down gameplay.

Ærena: Clash of Champions Scheduled For Mobile Release

Ærena: Clash of Champions Scheduled For Mobile Release

Oct 21, 2013

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Ærena: Clash of Champions is already available on Steam as an Early Access title, and is promised to come to the mobile market later. It’s a tactical turn-based action with a tesla-punk theme. Turn-based combat means that the game will be able to put PC players versus handheld devices, so prepare for some violent multi-platform battles. Release date is yet unknown, but screenshots and trailer are already available.

Tiny Legends: Heroes Review

Tiny Legends: Heroes Review

Aug 8, 2013

Tiny Legends is a pretty lengthy series of games of absolutely different genres, united with the common simplistic Minecraft-esque blocky graphics style. Tiny Legends: Heroes is a tactical arena action title, not unlike many other games of this genre. The story isn’t really important, as the brave heroes fight against dark forces in a fantasy world for another damn time. Tiny Legends: Heroes bets everything on the gameplay, and is quite successful at it, even if it’s not that unusual.

Tiny Legends: Heroes consists of three main parts: roaming the dungeon, fighting monsters, and resupplying at a camp. The camp part is quite simple: player can buy, sell, and equip various weapons and armor for the party members, buy and equip skills for the party members, and buy and exchange the party members themselves, spending gold that is earned from the dungeon. Although Tiny Legends: Heroes is free-to-play, meaning that the best clothes, skills, and party members are only available to the paying crowd, there’s no strong paywall. Even when the game starts being difficult, there’s nothing to stop the player from grinding levels and gold on earlier monsters.

Tiny Legends Heroes 2Dungeon roaming and monster-fighting are two parts of the same process. The player goes into a dungeon with a party of three that are displayed as one in the dungeon. The dungeon is filled with monsters and treasure. Picking the latter up simply grants some gold and loot, while coming into contact with the former will trigger a battle phase, not unlike Final Fantasy VII.

In the battle phase, all three heroes are standing on the single screen, while waves of monsters come at them from behind the borders, with the clear goal to knock their heads clean off. The heroes should be controlled by tapping on one of them, and dragging the finger onto the ground to move, onto a monster to attack him, or onto another hero, if cleric is selected, to heal him. Besides primary attacks, which differ by the hero type, each of them can learn several passive and active abilities, should they reach a required level. The active abilities need to be recharged before activating them again, while magic-wielding heroes also have a mana pool which needs to refill, before re-casting a spell. Although the whole battling process becomes quite monotonous after a while, wide range of heroes, equipment and skills allow Tiny Legends: Heroes to still be interesting.