Dungeon Gems Review

Dungeon Gems Review

Jul 17, 2014

Dungeon Gems is an arcade game where the player needs to clear out a bunch of dungeons with the help of some gems. Pretty self-explanatory, I think. Dungeon Gems has a very simple gameplay, but at the same time – a bit too many mechanics. The player has a roster of hero cards that he can improve, equip in his active squad, and manage in other ways. These heroes have different abilities and are all divided into five elements, dealing additional or reduced damage to other elements. They interact in the rock-paper-scissors fashion: water “beats” fire, fire beats wood and wood beats water. Light and Darkness are apart and counter each other. The dungeons’ denizens also belong to these elements, so half of the battle is won by choosing correct heroes for the dungeon.

The battles themselves depend on the player’s luck as much as on his cunning. There is an area, filled with the titular gems. The player needs to connect the gems of similar color Dungeon Gems 2– or, if he has some bonus points, of different colors – and bash the enemies with his heroes. The battles are strictly turn-based, so there’s no hurry to choose the gems or heroes’ special abilities. There are three battles in each dungeon, the last one being the boss. After beating the dungeon, the player gets gold to upgrade his heroes, and several hero cards added to his roster.

Generally, Dungeon Gems is fine, although I don’t understand the need for the free-to-play arcades such as this to be so complex. I mean, most of the mechanics in Dungeon Gems aren’t directly related to the process of completing the game, and just add a layer of managing on top, mostly just confusing the starting players. Which wouldn’t be bad, if the core game would consist of more than just swiping the finger across some gems and activate abilities every once in a while. I mean, it’s still enough to fill a game, but I’d rather have the developers make a more nuanced core game, rather than adding a bunch of hero properties and trade mechanics you probably won’t even remember. Anyway, Dungeon Gems turned out alright, free-to-play irritations notwithstanding, even if it gets kinda lost in other card-based arcades, filling the Play Store these days.

Card Wars – Adventure Time Review

Card Wars – Adventure Time Review

Apr 3, 2014

Card Wars – Adventure Time is an excellently-executed card game, and apart from some design issues, as well as a baffling lack of multiplayer, I thoroughly enjoyed it.

The rules should ring familiar to Magic The Gathering players. The game field consists of eight parts – four lanes, divided between two opposing players. The player fills their lanes with lands at the beginning of the game. Then the players take turns, placing creatures, buildings, or casting spells, ultimately trying to get the opposing player’s health down to zero. The creatures can only be placed on specific lanes, with some exceptions, buildings are put on any lane, and then improve any creature, placed on it, and spells do various things. The players have five mana points each turn, and every card has a certain mana price, depending on its power. While buildings and spells are simple, creature cards have several properties: health, attack, and special power. Special powers differ between the creatures and can be activated each turn by each creature – but they also cost mana. Sometimes it’s important to see what’s more important: using a creature’s power, or playing a card. Player also has a special power. The powers are different for every hero, and can be used every several turns.

Card Wars – Adventure Time is in no way limited in features. Player needs to build their own decks from scratch, unlocking new Card Wars 3cards in the campaign, and craft special cards if he finds a template. The campaign isn’t really varied, and consists of different heroes that the player needs to defeat, unlocking new cards and leveling his heroes in the process, but it’s large and does have some great rewards.

Card Wars – Adventure Time is a great card game overall, but it’s not without issues. It’s full of unnecessary screens and transfers, and I wish I could skip the cool animations if it meant getting to the next battle faster. Hero leveling mechanic cries an unfair advantage, because it not only gives larger card limit for a deck, but it also significantly improves the player’s base health. Pre-battle land filling is clunky and placing the damn stuff is a challenge in itself. Still, it doesn’t make the game boring, or really frustrating. But what the floop, Card Wars, where is multiplayer?

Overall, Card Wars – Adventure Time is miles better than other mobile TCGs. Its mechanics are simple, its cards are (mostly) fair, and it looks completely staggering. I definitely recommend it to any fan of trading card games, although I don’t think you’re going to enjoy it that much if you’re just in it for Adventure Time characters – or wish to play with your friends.

Presenting A New TCG From Marvel, X-Men: Battle of the Atom

Presenting A New TCG From Marvel, X-Men: Battle of the Atom

Mar 24, 2014

X-Men Battle of the Atom 4

It’s a new card game from Marvel, inspired by an epic cross-temporal event, happening as the X-Men series reach a 50-year anniversary. The players improve their heroes in single-player missions, and can battle it out between each other in the multiplayer. There’s a lot of new heroes, and the old ones have changed quite a lot. The game is available for free from here: X-Men: Battle of the Atom on Google Play.

Tyrant Unleashed Review

Tyrant Unleashed Review

Feb 19, 2014

Tyrant Unleashed is a trading cards game, and it’s a somewhat strange one. While some rules are going to be familiar to any player of Magic and the like, the gameplay lacks some very basic features that makes Tyrant Unleashed very different, and I think, a bit worse than the other TCGs.

The setting is a generic war in the far future with humans and aliens all battling against each other. I didn’t really follow the thin plot of the mission mode, but it looks like the game isn’t forcing anyone to. If you are really interested in it, there’s a button to the right that shows the unlocked portions of the story and gives basic lore overview of the battling fractions. There are several game modes, but they all have the same battle mechanics, and the worst part – they also all have “energy” bars that take time to recharge.

In the battle, players take turns, grabbing cards that represent units from their decks and laying them on the “field” to battle against each other, with the goal of reducing their heroes’ health points to zero. The strangeness of the game I mentioned is in the fact that, unlike most other TCG, in Tyrant Unleashed, players don’t get to choose where to place their units. Instead, they are automatically added at the end of the “queue”. It wouldn’t be critical if the player could choose where to strike, but the units strike automatically, by the order they were spawned, Tyrant Unleashed 3and only at the opposing units. Say, you have an infantryman and giant worm on your side, and the enemy has an assault vehicle and a medic on his.

When both of the players have spawned their units, first, your infantryman and enemy assault vehicle will fire upon each other, and then – your giant worm and enemy’s medic will. Like two towers of units, shooting at the opposite tower’s floor. When one “floor” is killed, the tower goes one level down. This requires a different tactical approach, but I think it’s not worth it. Since you don’t know in advance which unit the enemy will spawn next, you can’t really “build” your strategy without wild guessing. Also, there’s no “price” for units, so you’re left with spawning the best ones from the start, if you have them, and this also means that the player with the best cards completely dominates over the player with the lesser cards. In the end, I just chose the most powerful units on the team and then kept piling up medics so they wouldn’t die.

Then there’s the fact that I couldn’t find multiplayer battles. There was an option to join a guild, but for the life of me, I couldn’t find where to play multiplayer battles against human opponents – you’d think this would be the biggest button in a TCG. Anyway, I guess it’s up to anyone to check if Tyrant Unleashed is worth the time, but I found it mildly annoying and too much relying on “free-to-pay” mechanics, rather than on a solid card system.

EMPIRE: Deck Building Strategy Available For Just $0.99

EMPIRE: Deck Building Strategy Available For Just $0.99

Jan 9, 2014

EMPIRE Deck Building Strategy 2

The usual price for this turn-based strategy crossed with a cards game is $2.99, but now, the developers are bringing the price harshly down, so now any fans of turn-based strategies can pick it up for just a dollar. You can download it from here: EMPIRE: Deck Building Strategy on Google Play.

Elemental Kingdoms, A New Tactical TCG, is Released

Elemental Kingdoms, A New Tactical TCG, is Released

Dec 31, 2013

Elemental Kingdoms 2

From the developer Perfect World Entertainment, comes a new trading cards game, Elemental Kingdoms. It contains three game modes: castle building, dungeon exploring, and actual card battles. The battles look somewhat like Magic, which is a good sign, and contains more than 200 cards to play with. It can be downloaded from here: Elemental Kingdoms on Google Play.

Order & Chaos Duels Introduces Card Sets In A New Update

Order & Chaos Duels Introduces Card Sets In A New Update

Dec 16, 2013

Order & Chaos Duels 2

The popular free-to-play digital collectible cards game, Order & Chaos Duels, has been updated with two completely new decks of cards seeing light, one of them based on Chinese mythology, and other – in the primary elements. But it’s not the most interesting part of the update – it’s that now, if the player has cards from a specific set, his deck will get unique special abilities. The game can be downloaded for free from here: Order & Chaos Duels on Google Play.

Combat Monsters Release Date Is Announced

Combat Monsters Release Date Is Announced

Oct 21, 2013

Combat Monsters014

Turn-based strategy Combat Monsters is now on its way to release, with the release date set on 23rd of October. Combat Monsters is made by a BAFTA-winning studio, Rubicon Development, and will feature tactical gameplay, uniting a trading cards game with a turn-based strategy. The game is already available as an open Beta for home computers, and the details can be found here: Rubicon Development Official Site.