Everyplay Now Shares Video Replays from Android Games

Everyplay Now Shares Video Replays from Android Games

Feb 12, 2014

Everyplay has announced that their service for sharing videos recorded from games is now live on Android. Available in selected titles, and only devices running Android 4.1 or later, players can share replays of their most exciting game moments to the world. The first titles to utilize Everyplay on Android include Dead Trigger 2, with more titles to start rolling out with Android support now widely available.

VLC is Coming to Android – Try Out an Early Build Now

VLC is Coming to Android – Try Out an Early Build Now

May 21, 2012

VLC, the open-source cross-platform media player, is finally making its way to Android. While an official release is still in the distance, with the official VideoLAN website stating that VLC for Android is “in development,” impatient users who want to walk on the wild side can download an unofficial (as in, not released by VideoLAN themselves, although with code released under the GPL, anyone can compile the app) hourly build for Android. It comes in two flavors: a version that supports NEON-enabled processors, and a non-NEON version.

Really, the fact that VLC hasn’t been developed for Android before now is kind of baffling. VLC has been ported to iOS before, but DRM issues with distributing on the App Store shut it down. While an App Store-esque way of distributing apps exists on Android, it’s also easy to distribute a DRM-free app over the internet that would work on Android (itself an open-source OS). That daily releases are only now available seems odd, unless the technical hurdles have been that much greater.

Now, these are daily releases, so they have some instability and general bugginess , but the player works well enough for video playback of standard definition video on my Samsung Captivate, though that had no problem working through the built-in video app. My question was rather simple: would this work for high-definition video playback from a downloaded internet video? On a Tegra 2 device, it ran into issues, though performance was improved when hardware decoding was enabled. As well, some audio synchronization issues appeared.

While this isn’t as useful as the desktop version quite yet, and has performance issues to work out (compared to something like MX Player), the fact is that this app does exist, and given the desktop’s capabilities, this app could be something truly great. Just not today. However, this hourly version is a great start down the road to video playback freedom on Android.

Dropbox Introduces Background Photo and Video Uploading to Android App

Dropbox Introduces Background Photo and Video Uploading to Android App

Feb 24, 2012

Dropbox has released an update to their Android app to automatically allow photos and videos to be uploaded to a Dropbox folder for easy access from the cloud storage service.

This is a similar functionality to what Google+ has, although it offers video uploading as well. When a photo or video is captured, it uploads invisibly in the background to Dropbox, making it available anywhere Dropbox is available, including computers and other phones. The upload can be configured to only upload on wifi or on mobile networks if so desired. The process is entirely invisible, there are no notifications that background uploads are in process or finished unless or until the “Camera Uploads” folder is checked. Users are given an extra 500MB after the first photo or video upload as a bonus for using the service. Still, high-resolution photos and videos will take up a lot of space, so this may help spur sales of higher-capacity Dropbox storage plans. The update to Dropbox is available from the Android Market now, and is a manual update due to new permissions required.

Spool Unravels a Service for Saving Articles and Videos for Offline Consumption

Spool Unravels a Service for Saving Articles and Videos for Offline Consumption

Oct 10, 2011

Spool is a service that is hoping to bring the best of “read it later” services like Instapaper and Read It Later, and will apply it to other forms of media as well. As well, it’s attempting to do more by being designed for offline use as well.

The first use of Spool is that it serves as a service to read items at a later date, presenting items in an easy-to-read format. This is similar to Instapaper on iOS, only that this is a cross-platform service. There’s a browser extension for all the major web browsers. After installing the extension, the link is saved to the user’s spool. Then, the user can load up a mobile app, currently available for Android and iOS, and read the content that was saved. New content can be spooled from the app as well, by either searching or visiting a URL directly from within the app.

Now, this gets to the other part of Spool’s usefulness; Spool can be used to save videos for offline watching. By loading up the app once an item has been spooled, the site and video is loaded into local memory. This includes Flash videos; the Spool servers can record Flash video and convert them to a format that’s viewable on mobile, and able to be watched offline. Videos from Adult Swim and Dailymotion work well with the service. MLB.com doesn’t seem to work with Spool’s video conversion properly. YouTube videos can’t be saved for offline access at this time.

The ability to watch and view offline is a huge part of Spool’s utility; by preloading content, this makes it useful for watching videos in places where internet service may be less than ideal or even nonexistent; this is perfect for cell phone users on limited data plans or iPod touch owners. Download videos and content when on wifi, and then watch them whereever. The app is not necessarily optimized for tablets yet.

This app is especially interesting for iOS users looking to easily watch Flash videos on their phone or iPod, and for Android users looking for a service similar to Instapaper for their phones. Spool is free to use, but is currently only availble by invite only by registering at Spool’s website.