Activision Releases Wipeout 2 on Android

Activision Releases Wipeout 2 on Android

Aug 28, 2014

… and like that, it’s time for the sequel!

Activision has just announced its new game Wipeout 2, is a sequel to the original Wipeout (which we recently reviewed), and is again based on the obstacle game show that shares its name.

The new game is currently available for free (with in-app purchases) on the Play Store.

Excerpts from the press release and the trailer are below:

It’s time for a new season of big red balls – Activision Publishing’s Wipeout 2 spills out on iOS, Android and Kindle Fire devices today, drenching gamers with massive content in a free mobile package.

Wipeout 2 is an action platforming game based on ABC’s comically entertaining obstacle course competition TV series, Wipeout. Players dodge and traverse environmental hazards and challenges to emerge triumphant at the end of each level as fast as possible; those who miss a jump or are knocked off fall hilariously to the murky waters below.

A sequel to 2012’s mobile hit – Wipeout – Wipeout 2 ups the prize pool with 150 ridiculously themed obstacles across 135 new levels to dash, jump, crash and dive through. Contestants can choose from 10 playable characters, including the Zombie, Pirate and Popstar, which can be customized and upgraded with mighty abilities, including speed boosts, rewinds and teleportation. Special daily courses unlock a variety of equally special daily rewards, including coins and powerups to spring your experience forward, while social media leaderboards let you track bragging rights against friends and rivals.

Wipeout 2 is now available to download for free on the iTunes App Store, Google Play Store, and Amazon App Store.

[Source: Activision Press Release]

Wipeout Review

Wipeout Review

Aug 27, 2014

Years ago, I was flipping through the TV, and stumbled across a show that forever changed my TV watching habits: Most Extreme Elimination Challenge (MXC). The show itself was a irreverent Americanized version of the Japanese obstacle course show Takeshi’s Castle. The original show was a funny in and of itself, kind of like American Ninja Warrior on funny steroids; the added layer of deliciously re-edited and re-dubbed footage from the original took the show to hysterical heights.

A “true” American-centric version of the show popped up on the scene a few years ago called Wipeout. It is very similar to the original Japanese shows, down to the pain inducing obstacles and the zany commentary by the hosts. It was only a matter of time for the game to hit consoles, and it has since come to Android.


Wipeout will be comfortably familiar to fans of the console game and/or show; the basic premise is to make it wipe1through the obstacle course to the end in a reasonable time. The controls are pretty much all virtual in nature; the left side controls moving and running, while he right side can be used to invoke jumping and, with extra dexterity, diving. The obstacles run the gamut, and ae right in line with those from the real life game.

The action generally moves from left to right, and the player will want to jump and time movements so as to avoid being knocked or bounced into the water that is usually the only substance available to break one’s fall. If one falls or gets knocked off, one has to start right from the last section started. If one makes it the end in the time allotted, one qualifies for the ability to unlock the succeeding level with game cash.

Virtual pain gains game money (as does success); the two types of currency gained can be used in the in-app store to unlock characters, equipment and, as already mentioned, to formally unlock available levels. Equipment upgrades makes gameplay easier. These become important the further one gets in the game, as obstacles get harder. Of course, real money can be used.

It’s a fun game; I actually prefer it to the console version. The additional IAP after $1.99 purchase might give some pause, but I was able to play without going for real money. As such, the game represents the franchise well, and gives folks a relatively safe way to live life on the edge.