KickStarter Spotlight: Edo Superstar

KickStarter Spotlight: Edo Superstar

Aug 7, 2013

What is better than a good fighting game? Nothing. Beating the pulp out of a single opponent is the most visceral emotion that harkens back to the days of foraging and hunting for food. Well, maybe it is not quite that intense, but one can hardly deny the unique combination of simplicity and insane depth of fighting games. It is this balance that makes games like Mortal Kombat, Street Fighter, and Tekken so famous around the world. Each fight is simply nano-a-mano with no messy dialogue to be lost in translation, and even the long, detailed backstories included in most games is simply unnessisary. One would assume that mobile gaming would be awash with these games, but somehow a quick glance at the landscape is underwhelming. Maybe it is the fact that all major games are almost exclusively built on consoles and require super precise 4 or 5 button combinations, and that experience and control is impossible to achieve on a phone or tablet. It is going to take a fresh face to put out a fighting game worthy of capturing it’s own domain on the mobile platform, and the stunning Edo Superstar might be exactly that game.

The game designer, Jed Henry, is a professional artist and a massive fan of the traditional Japanese woodblock printing method. His previous KickStarter project, Ukiyo-e Heroes, was a mammoth success and brought a lot of funding and attention to the struggling art. His second project, the aforementioned Edo Superstar, is a more traditional fighting game combined with the traditional art style that Jed cherishes so much. The game really does look spectacular, and each animation transition seems to flow effortlessly. There is an airy feel about the entire game which is an extension from the astral art design and the simple yet effective swipe oriented control scheme.

Not much has been disclosed about the specifics of the control scheme, but it does seem to indicate that each move is linked to a corresponding swipe or tap, and aimed based on where that action is performed on the screen. This certainly seems innovative and I am excited to see how this translates into the actual game.

Pledges $50 or over receive an awesome woodblock print of the main character, Masaru; which helps stimulate the fledgling woodblock printing trade in Japan. This means that each donation not just supports the game but also a centuries old art form that has slowly been disappearing from the Japanese culture. After all that, if a badass fighting game emerges then that is just icing on the cake.

The game designer, Jed Henry, is a professional artist and a massive fan of the traditional Japanese woodblock printing method. His previous KickStarter project, Ukiyo-e Heroes, was a mammoth success and brought a lot of funding and attention to the struggling art. His second project, the aforementioned Edo Superstar, is a more traditional fighting game combined with the traditional art style that Jed cherishes so much. The game really does look spectacular, and each animation transition seems to flow effortlessly. There is an airy feel about the entire game which is an extension from the astral art design and the simple yet effective swipe oriented control scheme.

Not much has been disclosed about the specifics of the control scheme, but it does seem to indicate that each move is linked to a corresponding swipe or tap, and aimed based on where that action is performed on the screen. This certainly seems innovative and I am excited to see how this translates into the actual game.

Pledges $50 or over receive an awesome woodblock print of the main character, Masaru; which helps stimulate the fledgling woodblock printing trade in Japan. This means that each donation not just supports the game but also a centuries old art form that has slowly been disappearing from the Japanese culture. After all that, if a cool fighting game emerges then that is just icing on the cake.

Joseph Bertolini
Joseph is an Mechanical Engineering student at The Ohio State University as well as an amateur photographer.
Connect with Joseph Bertolini // email // www