Star Fleet Deluxe Review

Star Fleet Deluxe Review

Aug 28, 2014

Star Fleet Deluxe is a tactical game that apes Star Trek more than a little. Taking command of a huge starship, the player stands alone against a huge force of murderous aliens, hell-bent on eradicating any and all humans in the galaxy.

Star Fleet Deluxe is a very in-depth, turn based strategy game. The game takes place over a huge area, 81 quadrants of galaxy space to be precise, filled with stars, colonies, planets and starbases.

Screenshot_2014-08-24-21-18-32Star Fleet Deluxe has the player defending a vast universe. Using a slick icon based control system, the player zooms around the universe, seeking out and destroying the warlike Krellan that serve as the game’s primary foes.

Combat is quite in-depth. The player has both phasers and torpedos at his/her disposal and after targeting an enemy the intensity of phasers or the number of torpedos in the spread can be controlled. This allows the player to either destroy or disable targets. Disabled targets can be towed back to a starbase to capture the ship and take prisoners, both of which are usually required for mission objectives.

Screenshot_2014-08-24-16-21-35As the player cruises the universe, reports come in of colonies and starbases coming under attack. Colonies must be protected and starbases, while armed, may need aid as well. Both starbases and planets can resupply the player, so keeping them safe is important to surviving as well as passing the mission. Colony defence and supply management is the whole point of Star Fleet.

Unfortunately Star Fleet Deluxe sucks every iota of fun out of the gameplay with its insistence that every single vessel and base is destroyed in the time limit. It is extremely disheartening to spend twenty minutes on a mission, only to fail because one or two enemy bases on planets couldn’t be found in time. Never mind the fact the player just destroyed 40 ships single-handedly and saved all colonies and starbases, if there’s a single enemy ship or base anywhere, the mission is failed and the game must be started from scratch. This is terrible. There is no need for this exactness. Why not simply base it on the amount of met objectives rather than having to get every single one?

Also the way that boarding combat is handled is completely arbitrary. There is absolutely no control over it. Space Marines may simply flat out fail to take the smallest fighter or take it with nearly no causalities.

Star Fleet Deluxe’s graphics aren’t special at all. Like many strategic games the player spends most of their time reading text and thinking, not gawking at graphics. Star Fleet has a very good interface with plenty of detailed reports to help the player keep on top of their task. A series of icons is used to execute orders and it works very well.

Star Fleet Deluxe is a good strategy game that demands perfection just a little too much. With a less draconian mission structure this game could be great, but it is still a competent strategy game and worth playing.

Notepad Reminder Review

Notepad Reminder Review

Aug 27, 2014

Smartphones are predicated on convenience. The best apps are simple to use and make people’s lives easier. But for some reason, app developers have not harnessed the convenient potential of widgets. At least, that is the concept behind Notepad Reminder, a note-taking widget that is easy to use and easier to access.

Rather than digging through menus and taking time to open an app, widgets offer a way to interact with an app right on an Android device’s home screen. This feature is typically used to relay emails or check sports scores at a moment’s notice, but Notepad Reminder takes it to another level, adding usability and productivity right to the home screen.

Notepad-Reminder-2Users can install the widget on one of the many slides that make up their home screen and access all of the app’s features directly from the widget. In fact, there is no app, making it the most simplistic way to take notes on an Android device.

Instead of a one-sized-fits-all widget, the Notepad Reminder widget can be customized to a users liking on the home screen. This approach allows each individual user to get what they desire from the app. While one person may need the widget to be as large as possible to read notes, another may prefer a smaller widget to take short, simple notes on the go.

After positioning the widget on your Android device, you can immediately get started leaving notes. A small bar along the top of the widget prompts users to add a note and select a priority. The widget is helpful for completing tasks such as creating a grocery list or a to-do file for the day. However, users in need of taking larger, more intensive notes will find the widget experience cumbersome. Longer notes will display on the widget, but there isn’t room for a lot of information and typing within the bar is unintuitive.

Despite its simplicity, the Notepad Reminder widget also has some features that are typically found in full-fledged apps. Users can set a reminder for each note directly within the widget. Once a task is completed, the note can also be deleted efficiently. There are no complicated menu screens or additional buttons to press; all of this can be achieved directly from the widget using understated yet obvious buttons near each note.

The straightforwardness of the widget is its greatest strength, but also is its biggest weakness. Users will find themselves creating lists on the app, but only one list at a time. There are no organizing features to create long-form notes or organize a list with a title. It would be nice if users had the additional option of using the widget to directly open specific notes within the app. Instead, there is no physical app, meaning some users will find little function for the widget.

Overall, the Notepad Reminder widget is a solid way to jot down quick notes or run down a grocery list without having to dig through menus. However, the app is almost too simple. The oversimplified user interface and lack of a full featured app will make users quickly forget about Notepad Reminder.

Wipeout Review

Wipeout Review

Aug 27, 2014

Years ago, I was flipping through the TV, and stumbled across a show that forever changed my TV watching habits: Most Extreme Elimination Challenge (MXC). The show itself was a irreverent Americanized version of the Japanese obstacle course show Takeshi’s Castle. The original show was a funny in and of itself, kind of like American Ninja Warrior on funny steroids; the added layer of deliciously re-edited and re-dubbed footage from the original took the show to hysterical heights.

A “true” American-centric version of the show popped up on the scene a few years ago called Wipeout. It is very similar to the original Japanese shows, down to the pain inducing obstacles and the zany commentary by the hosts. It was only a matter of time for the game to hit consoles, and it has since come to Android.

Yes.

Wipeout will be comfortably familiar to fans of the console game and/or show; the basic premise is to make it wipe1through the obstacle course to the end in a reasonable time. The controls are pretty much all virtual in nature; the left side controls moving and running, while he right side can be used to invoke jumping and, with extra dexterity, diving. The obstacles run the gamut, and ae right in line with those from the real life game.

The action generally moves from left to right, and the player will want to jump and time movements so as to avoid being knocked or bounced into the water that is usually the only substance available to break one’s fall. If one falls or gets knocked off, one has to start right from the last section started. If one makes it the end in the time allotted, one qualifies for the ability to unlock the succeeding level with game cash.

Virtual pain gains game money (as does success); the two types of currency gained can be used in the in-app store to unlock characters, equipment and, as already mentioned, to formally unlock available levels. Equipment upgrades makes gameplay easier. These become important the further one gets in the game, as obstacles get harder. Of course, real money can be used.

It’s a fun game; I actually prefer it to the console version. The additional IAP after $1.99 purchase might give some pause, but I was able to play without going for real money. As such, the game represents the franchise well, and gives folks a relatively safe way to live life on the edge.

Battle of Tanks Review

Battle of Tanks Review

Aug 26, 2014

Battle Of Tanks is another entry in the rather crowded online tank battler. Does it HEAT things up?

Screenshot_2014-08-23-11-06-24Battle of Tanks‘ gameplay is too simple for its own good. There are no mission briefings or story; it is just the player in a tank of their choice. The player just drives around a featureless, treeless field (even if the description mentioned an outpost) using one of three weapons to blast enemy tanks into twisted metal. Weapons include the tank cannon, missiles which are very similar to cannons and machine guns, which are nearly useless.

The game lacks any interesting enemies either. There are no aircraft nor tank destroyers nor infantry, just other tanks firing in random directions.

Screenshot_2014-08-23-11-07-39One of the worst parts of the game though is the environments. Comprised of grassy fields with no interesting cover or things to look at, Battle of Tanks loses nearly all of its tactical potential. Without an environment to move around and take cover behind, the game is little more than a contest of who shoots first, which doesn’t make for exciting gameplay.

Battle of Tanks has very poor graphics. While it is indeed 3D as touted in the game’s description, the game just looks really bad. Most tanks are simply dull colored boxes, with nary a detail to be seen and the game’s environments are extremely poor without even a tree to look at. Explosions are simply expanding orange spheres and enemies all look the same. The resolution is low, the animation is nearly non-existent and Battle of Tanks just looks primitive.

The sound isn’t much better. There are no engine sounds at all, weapons all sound the same and the music is very generic.

Battle of Tanks‘ biggest failing however is its extremely imprecise controls. While it uses a familiar twin stick setup with one to control the tank and one to control the turret, these sticks are incredibly imprecise. Just driving in a straight line or rotating your turret in the general direction of an enemy is a huge pain because the game just won’t react correctly to touch.

Battle of Tanks is a difficult game mainly because it is so hard to move the tank with any kind of grace. Avoiding enemy shots is nearly impossible because often the controls won’t respond and the game spawns tanks behind you often and there is no radar to keep track of where enemies are and no cover to be used.

Battle of Tanks is a very poor game and it is clear from its title it is trying to emulate World of Tanks, but it is little more than a knock off. There are many, many better choices for tank based combat on Android. Check out Iron Force for super fun online tank combat with far better controls and actual environments.

Time Tangle – Adventure Time Review

Time Tangle – Adventure Time Review

Aug 25, 2014

Adventure Time is spawning so many game adaptations, it’s getting ridiculous. Not only that, but they all have different genres and seem to have different developers as well – it’s like Cartoon Network is giving out the license to everyone asking. Not that I’m against that, but you really never know what to expect when you get an Adventure Time game.

Time Tangle is an endless runner – and that’s the problem. It’s a runner that costs three bucks to play. It’s a decent title, but only when you compare it to other, free-to-play runners. And even then, there are some runners that exceed Time Tangle in some respect. I’m the last to defend free-to-play model, but come on – there’s not a single reason for Time Tangle to not be free, or almost free. It’s not entirely endless, and there’s a story advancement, but from the gameplay point of view, it’s just another runner with some action bits and cutscenes.

You play as Finn who runs forward and fights monsters and bosses, trying to restore the time totem that he shattered, because he’s prone to do that. The player can shift Finn Time Tangle 3sideways and jump, hit stuff to kill it, and activate a superpower if he “picked up” one of his friends on the way. Fighting is rather simple, but varying enemies and bosses make good use of it. The running part isn’t that exciting either, but since the player needs to fight and run at the same time, the gameplay manages to be rather entertaining. While running, Finn needs to complete missions that are assigned randomly and mostly require killing something, or getting somewhere in one piece. Again, they are just enough varied to be enjoyable. The awards for completing missions are time shards that need to be collected to advance the story. The more missions the player completes in a single run, the more shards he gets.

Two great things about Time Tangle are its writing and graphics. Although voice actors are very obviously not the ones from the series, the writing is pretty funny and the actors do a nice job. There’s not much talking in the whole game, though. The graphics and animation are also great, although Adventure Time’s design sets hard limits on 3D graphics. I think the game would look a lot better if it stopped trying to fit into Adventure Time’s heavily-styled 2D pants.

A word about items. There aren’t any. I still can’t grasp the need to collect gold from fallen monsters, as there’s absolutely nothing to purchase in the game. There’s a great and fun album that has information on every creature and item you encounter, but it has no real value and doesn’t require spending a virtual dime on.

Overall, I’d say Time Tangle is a disappointment. It’s a nice game, and it handles the Adventure Time trademark without issues, but it’s just not worth spending 3 bucks on. Unless you’re a big Adventure Time fan, you probably won’t find much of value in it. Most fun part about it is the Adventure Time world itself.

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Review

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Review

Aug 25, 2014

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles features everyone’s favorite mutant abominations beating the heck out of a bunch of thugs and cracking one-liners. What’s not to like? TMNT is loosely based on the rather lukewarmly received movie. Does it fare better than its big screen brethren?

TMNT plays less like a beat ‘em up and more like a kind of strange rhythm game. Swiping at an enemy automatically moves the turtle next to that enemy and from there swipes in different direction results in different attacks. Some attacks are fast, some ignore blocking and others allow the player to dodge easily. New enemies constantly drop in and each stage involves defeating a bunch of them as stylishly as possible. The swipe based system works very well and it is a nice change to not have to deal with a virtual pad.
Enemies about to hit the player glow with lighting and a tap anywhere on the screen will stop their attack and counter attack them instead.

Screenshot_2014-08-15-09-04-43After a bit of combat a sequence can be unleashed where two or more turtles attack together. Some neat mini puzzles have to be completed to trigger the attack correctly and this is good fun and looks really cool.

TMNT’s gameplay is fun stuff. Combat is satisfying, counter attacking is fun and the excellent sound and graphics really help the gameplay along. Between levels there are comic book cutscenes to expose more of the rather silly plot involving thugs taking over pizza restaurants and a proliferation of non-good mutants and these are lots of fun to watch.

Screenshot_2014-08-21-19-13-34Between bouts, players can spend coins earned on upgrades to turtles, such as making them stronger or faster. Gems can be spent on learning new moves as well. Gems are premium currency but are handed out rather often during gameplay. After finishing some levels the player will receive a few gems. Of course the player is never given enough gems to buy everything, but this doesn’t really matter as the game is fun enough without all the moves.

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles looks great. A coo cel-shaded style is easy on the eyes. Battles look very smooth and animate well and there is a good variety of enemies and punishing looking movies.

The sound is excellent as well. The game has tons of speech that is well acted and some pumping music and there is always something cool to look at or listen to. TMNT is very highly polished.

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles has a lot to do. There are plenty of stages and things to unlock and the game is fun so it is worth replaying older stages for more coins.

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles is a fun game and a great surprise considering the track record of most movie games. While the gem system may be slightly irritating, the game itself is good stuff and very well made. Play it today!

Freaking Math Review

Freaking Math Review

Aug 22, 2014

Simple games often thrive on phones. The format just suits simple games that can be played for minutes or even seconds when there’s a quiet moment or passing a phone between friends, trying to beat each other’s record. Freaking Math takes simplicity and files it down into something even more simple that simple. The result is a pretty damn simple game that looks like it took a few minutes to make, but is addictive, tough and a bit of fun.

Screenshot_2014-08-16-05-25-00Freaking Math is aptly described by its title. It makes you say f…reaking a lot and it is math. A series of sums appear on a colored screen that may be correct or incorrect. They are always very simple, elementary math level problems, such as 1+1=2 or 2+3=4. There is a tick and a cross button and the object is to tap the button to say whenever the sum is correct or not before time runs out, much like the little known 1977 Atari 2600 game Basic Math. Easy right? The catch is the time limit is literally one second. Taking more than one second to answer the sum or answering it wrong ends the game and displays the high score. The game is hard so games rarely last more than a minute and the game has a distinctly Flappy Bird-ish vibe to it, what with its super simple presentation and short game length.

The game gets harder the longer it is played and there are a series of achievements to shoot for, showcasing the rare players that can make it to 200 correct guesses. A high score list is also provided.

Screenshot_2014-08-16-05-23-11Despite seeming like a bad idea for a game, Freaking Math is addictive because of its challenge and how quick it is to play. Anyone who has played Flappy Bird will know the slightly masochistic tendencies that game tends to bring out in its players and Freaking Math is similar. The game is free and there are no irritating ads or anything in get in the way of its sole idea.

Freaking Math looks very basic. Graphically it consists of white text on brightly coloured screens with a large pair of buttons with a cross and a tick. This stark presentation is all that’s needed though and leaves no room for excuses about being unable to see or missing a button. The sound is limited to a click for a new game, a fanfare for getting one correct and a bzzt for losing. Get ready to hear that one a lot.

Freaking Math is simultaneously one of the easiest and hardest games on Android and perfect for a few moments with friends or just to work your brain a little. It is a testament to how just about anything can be made into a game and work well.

Unpossible Review

Unpossible Review

Aug 21, 2014

I’m an emotional mess, and it’s all because of Unpossible.

On paper, it’s a racing game, but it goes a bit beyond the basic paradigm. It starts from the intro screen, with the dazzling blue interspersed with dark undertones. The background cityscape is bathed in moonlight, and the electric feel is almost tangible in the way it invokes the night. The raceway is a blue-lined dark, tubular affair that extends in seemingly unending fashion over barren land.

Starting the game hints at the play style; it’s possible to control the motion by tilting or touch controls. The view is first person, and we have no idea of what is being raced, and frankly, it doesn’t really matter in this un1action affair. As soon as a run is started, the hosting device “becomes” the screen, and the device starts down the raceway at high speed. Now, it’s silly to expect no obstacles, and this is far from a silly game; different pieces appear in the path, and it is necessary to guide oneself around the lane to avoid them, as hitting one of them ends the run.

The measuring stick is the time one remains alive; easier said than done though, because this is where the delightful insanity of the gameplay becomes apparent. The longer one survives, the more frenetic the pace becomes. The developer uses simple but logical tools to force players to test reflexes. For instance, when the raceway arcs, one has a tougher time seeing ahead, and quicker moves are necessary to stay alive. There are different levels, but to unlock them, there are thresholds; for instance, the first level, Simplicity, is the default, unless one can make it 60 seconds to unlock the next level, and so on.

The latent strength of the game is its ability to draw out such a range of emotions: rage, joy, peace, disappointment… all wrapped up in addiction. It’s that good.

Someday, we’ll find out games like this are bad for us. I mean, who needs this type of crazy jolt on a daily basis? Till then, strap yourself in. It’s a crazy ride.

Brave Tribe Review

Brave Tribe Review

Aug 19, 2014

Brave Tribe is another freemuiem citybuilder, but this one tells the story of a small Celtic village completely surrounded by Romans who like their food and a good fight. If this sounds familiar it sure is. The opening cutscene has a lot of homages to a certain heroic little Gaul and there is even a Monty Python reference squeezed in there.

Screenshot_2014-08-14-09-30-11All this personality pretty much disappears when the game begins though. Taking control of a nearly featureless village, the player must build it up into a stronghold capable of supporting stronger warriors and defeating the encroaching Romans. Fighting off the Romans is as simple as tapping on them a few times though at least after the player has waited an hour or two to produce swords. A few basic quests provide direction and additional things to tap on.

Brave Tribe suffers from the typically slower pace of games of this type. BT however is much slower than others because of its food system. Food is required as fuel for any building or object in the game to work. Including farms. Buildings that generate money, such as farms, banquet tables, and such require food to function. This means before anything else the player must plant food in one of the player’s four fields and wait at least 5 minutes for the fastest crop or 2 hours for crops that provide enough for a few buildings at once.

Screenshot_2014-08-14-08-31-31After waiting, the player taps the crops to harvest them (a 5 second process) and then uses the food to create swords or get a building producing resources. This leads to another long wait from 5 minutes to a few hours while the building ticks away. At the end of that the player can finally harvest the small amount of coins or the needed item from that building and the cycle starts anew. This means that players need to generally wait twice for any object. Players should count themselves lucky if they can interact with anything in Brave Tribe more than a few times a day.

Brave Tribe’s tedious “gameplay” isn’t helped by some of the most exasperating ads this reviewer has yet experienced in a mobile app. When the app is started it displays a screen with links to G5’s other games and a “play now” button for Brave Tribe, rather than just starting the app. There is an ad for other games permanently displayed in game and the game nags you to turn on notifications. Lastly, the 5th quest received is to rate the game in the Playstore. In a game that makes the player wait constantly unless they play money. Rarely is a game so overbearing and downright asinine with its marketing. Annoying doesn’t even begin to describe it.

Brave Tribe is redeemed slightly by its graphics. Clear, colorful and cartoonish they mesh well with the game’s harmonious music and basic but fitting sound effects.

Without a doubt Brave Tribe is some of the least fun it’s possible to have on Android. With a boring and annoying building system, incredibly slow progress and absolutely no thinking required Brave Tribe is not worth playing

Baseball General Manager 2014 Review

Baseball General Manager 2014 Review

Aug 18, 2014

Baseball General Manager 2014 is extremely light on actual management. Players expecting something even remotely as complex and fulfilling as Football Manger will be sorely disappointed. BGM plays more like a social game than anything else.

BGM2104’s gameplay is extremely simple. Players play games by simply tapping on play then choose an opponent. The game then randomly determines though pure team value who wins. Player level doesn’t seem to make much difference it is simply about who has the more valuable team. Energy is expended by playing and players can be trained which increases their value slightly, making the team stronger. That is the extent of BGM14’s gameplay.

Screenshot_2014-08-15-07-09-56There are no tactical options. Forget about even the simplest tactical options such as reorganizing your outfielders or pinching hitters. None of that happens because playing games in BGM simply involves tapping the “play” button and then a screen appearing telling the player whenever they won or lost.

There is no gameplay or management whatsoever. Signing new players is ridiculous as well. Players have no attributes. The only thing that matters is their value compared to other players. Higher value players make it easier to win. Signing new players simply involves bidding on a randomly selected group of players and hoping other players don’t outbid you. Any player of management games knows that scouting for and signing promising players is one of the most fun parts of the game, so this is a disappointment.

Screenshot_2014-08-15-04-42-13It is really a wonder that the MLB endorses this game as there isn’t even the barest vestiges of tactics available for matches. It captures none of the flair of baseball. It simply is not a management game at all.

Because this a freemium game, there are plenty of pay to win buffs as well, such as sport drinks that prevent training progress from mysteriously disappearing and just buying additional currency with real money.

Baseball General Manager 2014 is also distinctly unpolished. There is no sound at all, the interface looks cheap like a Facebook game and the message centre headings are inexplicably in Mexican rather than English. Server errors are common. The game as a whole is laggy despite being simple text and pictures. Training sometimes just plain doesn’t work unless you restart the app as it failed to unlock. Baseball General Manager 2014 just feels amateurish.

Baseball General Manager 2014 is not a management game at all and is not worth playing in the slightest. Fans of sport management have one choice on Android and that choice can only be Football Manger 2014. Grab that for a far, far more satisfying sporting experience.

Transport Tycoon Review

Transport Tycoon Review

Aug 18, 2014

Transport Tycoon is a well tweaked blast from the past that allows the player to build a transport empire from the ground up. Is it a wheely good time?

transporttycoon02This version of Transport Tycoon is actually not based on the original TT, but an older game known as Locomotion, also by the legendary Tom Sawyer. The basic idea is still the same though: the player starts in a land full of factories, coal mines and towns must construct a robust transport network to get goods where they need to be and passengers to their destination and make as much money doing it as possible.

To do this the player begins by constructing roads and railways if needed then the stations and depots for their vehicles. Goods can be shifted by a fleet of buses or trucks, but the real money is in a high quality rail network. This can shift massive loads of resources across vast distances quickly.

Screenshot_2014-08-12-23-09-20For example: the player sets up a small rail network to deliver coal and ore from mines to a steel mill. A truck station is built nearby and a fleet of trucks begin transporting the valuable metal to a nearby factory. The factory then creates goods, which are loaded onto a ship and shipped to a distant town on the other side of the map. That town has an airport, shunting passengers to another distant town and back in their passenger jets, raking in the cash. Of course other companies are out there vying for a bigger piece of the cargo pie. TT is all about building infrastructure in such a way that transport using it travels as quickly as possible.

TT has a great control system. A great touch based interface replaces the mouse cursor of yore and building global transport networks is a snap. A solid tutorial eases the player into the game as well.

Transport Tycoon features lots of fun scenarios, which range from making certain amount of profit to reaching a certain company rating. The large number of scenarios helps give the game focus and provide fun challenges.

Transport Tycoon has a few caveats, however. Road vehicles really need rebalancing as they carry little cargo and have a hard time paying for themselves. Trains and aircraft are much more efficient, so there is rarely a need to have a large road based network, which is a bummer for those who would like to try making a trucking company. The game also lacks an easy way to replace aging vehicles, so the player periodically has to trawl though their few dozen vehicles looking for superseded or unreliable older models.

The most major problem however is the rather broken way laying rail and road works. The game is incapable of levelling tertian without player input and even the slightest sideways slope or uneven land forbids anything being built on it. Laying a long stretch of rail to one area of the map to another usually involves fixing 15-20 squares of land at the least in lots of either 1 or 4. This was a major problem in the original game as well. Players of SimCity will be very frustrated.

Still Transport Tycoon retains all the depth and satisfying strategic gameplay the original had and with an active development forum and a driven fanbase the game can only get better.

The Room Review

The Room Review

Aug 15, 2014

Mobile gamers rarely get to experience truly innovating games. Most of the high-quality titles are simply good at copying others. The Room is an incredible exception to that fact, as it’s the most fun and unusual quest I’ve played in several years.

The subject of The Room is a series of intricate and impossibly complex locked cabinets, containing clues about a mysterious discovery the player character needs to uncover. The game quite literally revolves around these lockers. The player needs to move the camera around the locker and try to unlock all of its locks, clasps and seals by a series of actions that might just make a person go crazy. The player needs to find keys, pick combinations, scout the locker for clues – and I’m not being sarcastic when I say that it’s damn easy to get lost around the cabinet. Screenshots don’t do justice to the crazy amount of elements each locker contains, and although there are hints, I got mildly frustrated several times, trying to solve the puzzles, or trying to find what the hell I was supposed to do next. It’s not that frustrating to complete, but it’s quite a challenge.

Another outstanding element in The Room is its design. Each piece of each safe is rich with engravings, details, and has great sound design. I literally cannot believe The Room 4this game is only worth a dollar, because it’s easily one of the best-looking and atmospheric games on the platform. The controls are quite awesome as well. Not only do they make use of the touch-screen, but they actually don’t make me want to strangle myself with an earplug cord! During the game, the player has to slide, rotate, turn, and switch an untold number of plugs and bits, and actually having to perform the actions, instead of just clicking on stuff, gives a great amount of satisfaction.

I’m not sure, but it’s entirely possible that The Room is number one Android quest there is. It’s worth ten times its price, and it even manages to cram a captivating story inside of its locked cabinets, in the form of notes and diaries. I don’t want to imply that it’s perfect from all sides – actually, screw that. The controls take a bit of getting used to, but besides that, The Room is a perfect Android quest.